All You Need To Know About Roger Federer’s RF logo

Published 12/04/2020, 12:29 AM EST
Roger Federer celebrates victory during his mens singles first round match against Lorenzo Sonego of Italy during Day one of the 2019 French Open at Roland Garros on in Paris, France. (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)


The famous Roger Federer ‘RF’ logo is back to its rightful owner. Looking back at the journey of the most iconic symbol of an athlete ever, the story is even more compelling. It all started in 2003, when Mirka Federer, wife of the Swiss genius, created a perfume named after him.

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To market and sell the product, Mirka drew the perfume bottle with a logo made with Federer’s initials. Ahead of its time, the perfume vaporised, but the logo got its rebirthing with American giant, Nike. Soon, it became an integral part of the tennis culture worldwide.

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The logo remained with Nike from 2006 to 2020

LONDON, ENGLAND: Roger Federer of Switzerland celebrates victory with the trophy after the Gentlemen’s Singles final against Marin Cilic of Croatia on day thirteen of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club at Wimbledon on July 16, 2017, in London, England. (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

Embodying serif font initials of the 20-time Grand Slam winner, the logo first appeared at Wimbledon Championships 2006. Thereafter, it found its presence in every merchandise exclusive to Nike and Roger Federer. It’s the simplistic design and the widespread popularity of the Swiss player that helped it obtain a legendary status in no time.

Tennis fans, much to their liking, saw a new medium to express their support in a clean and sophisticated manner. And, for many years to follow, the RF logo remained as a mark of greatness and leadership. The monogram also carved an ever-lasting bridge between the Basel-born and his fans all around the globe.

In 2018, the Swiss maestro moved on from Nike to join hands with the Japanese company, Uniqlo. However, Federer couldn’t take his iconic figure with himself. The athletic-wear company kept the logo until all their RF stock got cleared. After 2 years, Roger regained the rights of his evergreen logo.

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Uniqlo and Federer unveiled their first RF caps

Roger Federer of Switzerland celebrates winning match point during his Men’s Singles first-round match against Steve Johnson of the United States of America on day one of the 2020 Australian Open at Melbourne Park on January 20, 2020, in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

Giving 2020 a surprising conclusion, the 39-year-old greeted his fans with the new branding of his traditional logo. With ‘Go Roger’ wordplay embroidered on the back, the RF caps are launched in 8 different shades. They will be available in the market from December 8 of this year.

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Considering this, Federer will sport the cap in the upcoming major tournament, the 2021 Australian Open. His much-awaited return to tennis after a year-long break has risen to a new height since the news came.

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The only question that is left unanswered is whether the Swiss maestro will lift another Grand Slam title. It is only fair to say that there will be lots of RF caps in Melbourne Park waiting for the answer.

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Purav Joshi

1114 articles

Purav Joshi is a Tennis author at EssentiallySports. Having a degree in Films, Television and Media Production, he guided his passion for writing and journalism into the sport of aces and rallies. With over 2 years of experience as a copywriter, Purav has authored over 500 tennis articles.

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