Aslan Karatsev Breaks Andrey Rublev’s Incredible ATP 500 Streak to Reach Finals at Dubai Tennis Championships

Published 03/19/2021, 2:24 PM EDT
Tennis – Australian Open – Melbourne Park, Melbourne, Australia, February 17, 2021 Russia’s Andrey Rublev during his quarter final match against Russia’s Daniil Medvedev REUTERS/Jaimi Joy


It was the night of the semi finale at the Dubai Tennis Championships 2021 and World No.8 Andrey Rublev was up against Aslan Karatsev. In an exciting contest, it was the underdog Karatsev who performed under pressure and won the match. The final scoreline of the match was 6-2, 4-6, 6-4.

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It is surely a dream come true for Aslan Karatsev. The World No.42 player is now in the finals of the ATP Dubai 2021 after defeating both Andrey Rublev and Jannik Sinner. As for Rublev, it is definitely a night to forget as his win streak at the ATP 500 events also got broken after this humiliating defeat.

Set-1: Aslan Karatsev breaks twice and wins the set easily

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Serving first, Rublev easily won the first game of the match. However, Karatsev equalized soon and brought the scoreline to 1-1. The same thing happened in the next two games as well.

After this, Karatsev broke in the next game and extended his lead further by winning the subsequent game as well. He was now leading 4-2. Surprisingly, the Russian player broke yet again in the seventh game and was now just one game away from winning the set.

He didn’t take much time and finished it in the next game only with the help of a powerful forehand. Karatsev, thus, took the set 6-2.

Set-2: Andrey Rublev makes a good comeback

Serving first again, Rublev conquered the first game and won a game after losing four games. The World No.8 player was hitting the net too often and was not able to control his shots. Karatsev took advantage of it and leveled the scoreline in the next game.

Tennis – ATP 500 – Rotterdam Open – Rotterdam Ahoy, Rotterdam, Netherlands, Russia’s Andrey Rublev celebrates winning his quarter-final match against France’s Jeremy Chardy REUTERS/Piroschka Van De Wouw

The one who served continued to win and soon, the scoreline became 3-3. Karatsev earned four breaking points in the event game but failed to capitalize on any of them. He even won a break point in the ninth game but Rublev managed to survive that as well. The scoreline at this moment was 5-4 with Rublev leading.

He broke for the first time in the match in the next game and restored his hopes. By that, Rublev won the set 6-4.

Set-3: Karatsev earns the ticket to the finale

The story repeated again with Rublev winning the first game and Karatsev equalizing it in the second. However, in the third game, Rublev saved four break points but ultimately lost on the fifth one. Thus, Karatsev broke and took the lead 2-1.

Karatsev gained momentum and won the next game without losing a single point. He was now leading 3-1 in the decisive set. Even though he lost the next game, he won the next-to-next one to extend his lead to 4-2.

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Surprisingly, Karatsev broke again in the seventh game and was now just one game away from earning the ticket to the finale. However, Rublev showed some really good gameplay in the subsequent game. He broke and narrowed down the margin to 5-3. Surprisingly, he also went on to win the next game and was now just one game away from equalizing the scoreline.

However, Karatsev regained his momentum and delivered some powerful serves to finish the set in the tenth game. He conquered the set 6-4, and thus, won the match.

 

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Anshul Singh

791 articles

Anshul Singh is a tennis author at EssentiallySports, currently pursuing Journalism Honors from Delhi University. Having significant experience with content, Anshul has authored over 500 tennis articles. He has previously worked as a writer and an editor for DU Express, penning riveting articles on sports, politics, and culture.

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