“That Would Have Been an Incredible Ending”: Roger Federer Drops Broad Hint on Retirement

Published 12/14/2020, 1:43 AM EST
Roger Federer of Switzerland reacts with tears as he watches a surprise video from former Argentine football player and coach Diego Maradona talking about him after an exhibition game between Alexander Zverev and Roger Federer at Arena Parque Roca on November 20, 2019 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. (Photo by Marcelo Endelli/Getty Images)


In what is the first broad hint on his future in tennis, Roger Federer has conceded that he is in a race against time.

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There has been a rising chorus of voices around his retirement, especially after he underwent a second surgery on a troubling knee after the Australian Open this year, putting him out of action thereafter.

Roger Federer of Switzerland celebrates winning match point during his Men’s Singles first round match against Steve Johnson of the United States of America on day one of the 2020 Australian Open at Melbourne Park on January 20, 2020 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Quinn Rooney/Getty Images)

Further delay in start of Australian Open will help, says Roger Federer

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At 39, there are doubts on whether he could recover well enough to be back in action next year and, possibly, prolong his career.

Gracing at an awards show in his homeland, the Swiss Master seemed to hint that his storied and glittering career as a professional tennis player may be drawing to a close.

Though the Australian Open, the year’s first Grand Slam, is likely to be pushed back to February 8 from its usual start date of January 19, the 39-year-old Federer said that it might still leave him with a ‘tight’ race to fitness.

Filling his fans with a depressing sense of inevitability, the 20-time Grand Slam winner hinted that he may even have played his last match.

“I would have hoped that I would be 100 hundred percent in October. But I am still not today. It will be tight for the Australian Open,” Federer said.

Federer says he won’t return till he is ready

The Swiss Ace said that he does not want to rush back and is willing to give himself more time to regain full fitness.

 

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Federer also said that it would help if the Australian Open was delayed further, adding, however, that an extra three weeks to the start of the year’s first Major, as is likely, would be a boost to his comeback bid.

“It will be complicated for the Australian Open. I don’t want to take the next step until I’m ready. These three weeks could help me a bit.

I’m curious to see whether it will start on February 8. Of course, it would help if I had a bit more time,” Federer said.

 

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Federer sets sights on Majors, Tokyo Olympics

He said he still has his eyes on the four Majors next year, as well as a singles gold at the Tokyo Olympics.

Federer, who will ring in his 40th birthday next August, doesn’t have an Olympics gold to his name.

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The veteran, who was chosen as the best Swiss athlete in the last 70 years at the awards night, ended his acceptance speech with a touch of optimism.

“I hope there is still something to see from me next year.

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But if that was it, that would have been an incredible ending for me at these Sports awards,” Federer said.

His fans would sure want him to not commit to a retirement date anytime soon.

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Federer’s last match was the semifinal loss to Novak Djokovic at the Australian Open.

 

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Priyabrata Chowdhury

1101 articles

Priyabrata Chowdhury is a tennis author for EssentiallySports. He has been a print journalist for a decade, producing news pages for leading national dailies such as the Hindustan Times and The New Indian Express. His passion for sports eventually drove him to tennis writing.

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