All You Need to Know About Wimbledon Championships Trophies

Published 06/16/2021, 10:24 AM EDT
Serena Williams of USA and Rafael Nadal of Spain with their winners trophies at the Wimbledon Championships 2010 Winners Ball at the InterContinental Park Lane Hotel on July 4, 2010 in London, England. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)


Founded in 1877, the Wimbledon Championships is the oldest tournament in professional tennis. Moreover, it is renowned in the world for its traditions, trophies, and beautiful grass courts.

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Notably, it is the only one of the four Grand Slams held on the traditional grass surface. Along with that, it has five exceptional trophies that carry its century-old history.

Wimbledon men’s singles championships trophy

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The present-day Gentlemen’s singles championship trophy has a fascinating story that dates back a century. In 1877, the All England Club presented the first-ever singles trophy known as the Field Club.

After seven years, the Challenge Cup replaced the previous trophy until 1886. During that time, British professional William Renshaw won both of them and retained them from 1881 to 1886.

Read More: How Much Do Wimbledon Championships Tickets Cost?

Indeed, giving away the cup annually had become a hefty affair. And because the All England Lawn Tennis Club could not afford that, they introduced a new 100 guineas-worth trophy. 

Most significantly, the club passed a rule that the cup would not go with the winner anymore but would instead get to take home a replica. The tradition that began in 1888 continues till date.

WIMBLEDON, ENGLAND: Roger Federer of Switzerland celebrates victory with the trophy after the men’s singles final match against Andy Roddick of the USA on Day Thirteen of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club in London, England. Federer won 5-7, 7-6, 7-6, 3-6, 16-14. (Photo by Paul Gilham/Getty Images)

Notably, the cup is 18 inches tall and 7.5 inches in diameter. And its silver-gilt body gives it a prestigious outlook. Additionally, there is a: “The All England Lawn Tennis Club Single Handed Championship of the World” inscription made on it.

The replica, 13.5 inches tall, carries all past winners’ names engraved around the bowl. The original added a black plinth, including an ornamented silver band in 2009 since there was no space left for the names of new Wimbledon champions.

Watch this story: When Roger Federer Toyed His Opponent So Bad He Asked for Advice From Andre Agassi in the Crowd

Wimbledon women’s singles trophy

Unlike the men’s singles trophy, the women’s singles champion gets a silver salver since 1886. It is otherwise famous known as the Venus Rosewater Dish.

It is 18.75 inches in diameter, made up of sterling silver, and gilded at some places. Also, similar to the men’s singles cup, even women’s singles champions receive a replica, which is 14 inches in diameter, engraved with all past champions’ names.

Doubles and mixed doubles Wimbledon Championship trophies

In 1884, the Oxford University Lawn Tennis Club gave All England Club the Gentlemen’s Pairs’ trophy. Additionally, HRH Princess Marina, president of the All England Club, presented them with the Ladies’ Doubles trophy in 1949. While the former is a silver challenger cup, the latter is an exquisite silver cup with a cover.

The ladies’ doubles cup is also called the Dutchess of Kent Challenge Cup.

Lastly, the mixed doubles’ champions at Wimbledon receive a silver challenger cup and a cover. It comes from the family of a former two-time champion, the late S.H. Smith.

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For fans, the trophies are on display for most of the year in their museum. Unquestionably, they are and continue to be an integral part of the tournament’s tradition.

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Purav Joshi

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Purav Joshi is a Tennis author at EssentiallySports. Having a degree in Films, Television and Media Production, he guided his passion for writing and journalism into the sport of aces and rallies. With over 2 years of experience as a copywriter, Purav has authored over 500 tennis articles.

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