How Did Mike Tyson Master the Art of ‘Peek-a-Boo’ Boxing?

Published 10/29/2021, 9:31 AM EDT
Mike Tyson in London to see Frank Bruno against James ‘Quick ‘ Tillis, (Picture) Mike Tyson sparring, 25th March 1987. (Photo by Brendan Monks/Daily Mirror/Mirrorpix/Getty Images)


Mike Tyson, in his prime, was one highly intimidating knockout artist. He took the sport by storm by introducing a unique fighting style. But what was so special about Tyson’s fight style? And how did he develop a ‘peek-a-boo’ boxing style?

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

Cus D’Amato is one prime name in the boxing universe credited for bringing the ‘peek-a-boo’ style into the limelight. He taught Tyson the art of Sweet Science, and alongside that, D’Amato taught his fighter this unique fighting style.

The ‘peek-a-boo’ style refers to a boxer keeping his hands in front of his face and moving quickly inside the squared circle.

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

With this approach, Mike Tyson attained an unbelievable amount of success in his iconic boxing career. The ‘peek-a-boo’ style involves a lot of stamina, constant movement, and the utilization of overwhelming power. On top of that, the boxer has his chin covered most of the time with this style, as his hands are always at the top, acting as a guard.

The ‘peek-a-boo’ style helps a boxer close the distance and land a barrage of punches. Moreover, this fighting style suits everyone as well as short fighters. Tyson, 5’10’‘, wasn’t a giant heavyweight, and the style worked fine for him. The style helped him chase down his opponents with the best of shots.

Moving on, the ‘peak-a-boo’ style helps a boxer keep his defense on top with some sublime rolling and slipping. Also, a fighter always keeps moving his neck in this style, which eventually helps him dodge some power punches to the face.

Disadvantages of Mike Tyson’s ‘peek-a-boo’ style

There are tons of advantages to this attractive fighting style. But, it also comes with a few disadvantages.

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

LAS VEGAS – FEBRUARY 25: Mike Tyson boxes Frank Bruno at the Hilton Hotel-Casino on February 25, 1989 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Tyson defeated Bruno with a TKO in Round 5. (Focus on Sport via Getty Images)

The biggest disadvantage is the high energy expenditure. In the ‘peek-a-boo’ style, a boxer is constantly on his toes, looking to be defensive while trying to sneak in some power-packed offense.

Also, heavyweights generally do not have the best stamina. That said, this style can be consuming enough if not executed properly. However, Mike Tyson, with this style, was capable of finishing his fights in a flash as well as going the distance.

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

This is what made him a special fighter, all things considered.

Watch this story – Boxing Schedule November 2021: Canelo vs. Plant, Crawford vs. Porter

Enjoyed reading this article? Download our exclusive app to get 24x7 coverage, latest memes and social media banter. Click here to download.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE :

ADVERTISEMENT

Prathamesh Singh Chauhan

2192 articles

Prathamesh Singh Chauhan is a Boxing Author at EssentiallySports. He is a graduate from the International Institute of Sports Management who combines his love for sports, particularly combat sports, and his flair for writing and analysis to help him in his day-to-day work. He has prior professional experience with sporting organizations such as Star Sports, Khelo India, and NBA.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT