Carlos Sainz Jr. Described His Home Race As ‘Strange’! But Why So?

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Carlos Sainz Jr.
Autosport

Carlos Sainz Jr. qualified ninth on the grid in the 2018 Grand Prix and finished seventh. His improvement, therefore, of not one but two places up the grid was the best result for his Renault team, especially since his then-teammate, Nico Hulkenberg- who continues to drive for Renault in 2019- managed no points in the race.

For a driver who’s both quick and focused on giving nothing but his best, it was heartening to see the local-boy Carlos Sains Jr.’s 2019 form at the recently-concluded Spanish Grand Prix.

This time, however, the young driver who admires Fernando Alonso endlessly so managed a fighting eighth in his home Grand Prix. It was a step in the right direction that many would’ve noted. This was, after all, a big occasion for the home-grown talent of Spain, especially driving a car for which his racing idol- the famous Spanish Samurai- drove in 2018.

But in his 2018 effort, Carlos Sainz Jr. improved his form during the race, finishing eighth on the grid, whilst having qualified only thirteenth. Not too bad for a driver who’s competing alongside some big names on the grid who’ve driven at tracks like Barcelona¬† on a number of occasions before, right?

But it wasn’t the only race where he excelled, one may say. Carlos Sainz Jr. would, in fact, go a few notches ahead and make some interesting ideas in regards to a sport to which he brings flair and passion.

But before, that, a perspective.

Surely, and it can be said with quite a certainty that Carlos Sainz Jr., hasn’t made a show of his emotions, up until now, which is precisely when he expressed his perspective about the Spanish GP, especially keeping in mind the brilliance of the two Silver Arrow cars. He’d also suggest how ‘similar results’ – virtually, a thing of the current times at the top of the grid featuring Mercedes- are perhaps not lending the greatest aid to a team-based sport, one where it’s often the dynamics of everyone one the grid that matter the most.

To that end, a leading online journal reported the following about the avid youngster, who, at some point, would love to make his own identity, hopefully without having to face the ignominy of enduring similar race results and challenges, something that he shared candidly recently.

“It would be a shame to lose this grand prix. I think everyone agrees that basically, we need to create a bit better of a show,” Sainz said when asked by a venerable platform about the potential loss of the race.

“The crowd is not going to come here to see always the same result, always the same people winning, and we need to see something more. See more people on the podiums, winning, to make F1 more attractive.”

So what do you think about Carlos’ views? Can F1 now finally decide to engineer ideas that help popularise the sport and make it more popular than it ever is, as seen now?