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“Making Up a Fake Sob Story”: Despite Floyd Mayweather Growing Up in a “Rough Situation”, Fans Remain in Disbelief After Past Remarks Resurface

Published 09/11/2023, 8:10 AM EDT

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Boxing: a realm of punches, pain, and poignant tales. Rags-to-riches narratives are almost cliché. Think Manny Pacquiao. From shanty towns to stardom. Then there’s Floyd Mayweather. Heralded as one of the best. A master in the ring. Outside it, a storyteller. A recent quote surfaced. Mayweather painted a vivid picture of his past. A project building. One-bedroom. Seven people. No hot water. Compelling? Yes. Authentic? That’s where eyebrows raised.

Not everyone’s buying his story. Here’s the twist. Mayweather’s father? A pro boxer. His uncle? Another ring master. Could a family of pros really have faced such dire straits? Did Mayweather embellish his past? Or is he simply sharing an overlooked chapter of his life?

Is Floyd Mayweather the Manny Pacquiao of America?

Floyd Mayweather, a name synonymous with boxing excellence, has always been known for his unwavering confidence both inside and outside the ring. But his recent reflections on a supposedly impoverished childhood added a new layer to his storied legacy. He painted a picture of an upbringing marked by hardship: cramped living conditions in a project building and the constant absence of basic amenities like hot water. A story that, if true, showcases resilience and determination.

However, one fan quickly made a comparison, noting, “Same with Pacquiao. They were very poor when he started… he shared his millions to those in need.” Their comment highlights how Manny Pacquiao’s well-documented rags-to-riches story ended in philanthropy, implying a genuine connection between past hardships and present generosity.

Then, skepticism entered the scene. Another fan dismissively stated, “Ya clown, your dad was a pro before you. You don’t know what being poor is.” Clearly, they challenge Mayweather’s authenticity, pointing to the boxing career of Mayweather’s father as evidence of potential financial stability.

Adding fuel to the skepticism, another user quipped, “His father and uncle were pro fighters. No money in that family, huh? Stop the games.”.

And just as the debate was heating up, another person threw in a zinger. “Lol, Floyd just like Jake Paul making up a fake sob story. Dude grew up in an above middle-class family and a pops who was pro, making big $, it’s funny.” Their stance is more biting, likening Mayweather to YouTuber Jake Paul, known for his antics and often-controversial narratives.

Yet, amidst the cynics, a beacon of support emerged in one person, who remarked, “The champ believed in himself before anyone else did.” Their comment shifts the focus from Mayweather’s upbringing to his undying self-belief, a trait that undeniably played a role in his journey to boxing supremacy.

Watch: Renowned Actress Trolls Floyd Mayweather to His Face After He Fails to Spell “GOAT” Correctly

In the whirlwind of boxing legends and the narratives they weave, Mayweather’s tale stands out, tinged with both skepticism and support. These rags-to-riches stories, while compelling, often raise the question of authenticity. So, as we reflect on the discourse his revelations ignited, one must wonder: Does the authenticity of a backstory diminish or enhance an athlete’s legacy? Or is it their performance and character in the spotlight that truly defines them?

Watch This Story: Floyd Mayweather General Trivia Quiz: How Well Do You Know ‘TBE’?

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Written by:

Mrinal Mishra

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Mrinal Mishra is a Boxing writer at EssentiallySports, who is dedicated to covering live events with a special emphasis on influencer boxing events. With a focus on storytelling, Mishra strives to bring to light the stories of fighters that often go untold. As a big fan of Mike Tyson, Mishra believes that boxing will remain relevant for eternity, and he is committed to covering the sport with the respect and admiration it deserves.
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Edited by:

Snigdhaa Jaiswal