CS:GO Pro Gets Wrongfully Banned On Valorant?

Published 04/16/2020, 4:28 PM EDT


Valorant by Riot Games is raging throughout the gaming community right now with its closed-beta. Breaking records all around, it definitely has to be the most-watched game so far this year. Dubbed as the game which will replace CS:GO. It is safe to say Valorant is on every social media now. While viewership skyrocketed, the gaming community is also torn in a debate about the safety measures used by Riot. Vanguard, the anti-cheat system which Valorant uses, has been at the epicenter of controversy. 

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The kernel-level drive (vgk.sys) functions exactly as its name suggests, it starts when your console starts up. This has been raising eyebrows for a while now. Paul Chamberlain, the anti-cheat head designer for Riot Games, reaffirmed the community with his statements. They also began their crackdown on cheater from the get-go. This time out, it was really disheartening to see one of the pro getting banned for just connecting his phone.

So What Went Wrong?

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Oscar Cañellas, a pro CS:GO streamer from Spain, caught off guard and booted from the game right before the game started. He plugged in his phone, and the program retaliated immediately. While this came as a shock, it also displayed the unnecessary over-efficiency of their anti-cheat system. “I connected my USB charger to my phone and I got disconnected by the anti-cheat, can you unlock me please”, this is what Oscar had to say after being banned wrongfully.

In their attempt to drive out all cheaters from the game, Riot Games have created an anti-cheat which makes errors like these. This was definitely unforeseen and shows us how strong their kernel-level drive has side effects.

Valorant Anti-Cheat System Doesn’t Spare Anyone

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Vanguard is up and functional, and Riot Games are trying their best to make this game one of the best inline, devoid of cheating. Paul Chamberlain did agree that eventually people will learn how to break the code. He also defended the system by stating that, yes, it does use a kernel-level drive to protect the game, but that doesn’t invade privacy. This reassurance, added with the swift action witnessed with Oscar Cañellas only adds to debate. If this errenous system isn’t corrected, then Riot Games are definitely going to receive some backlash from the gaming community.

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Dipanjan Dey

502 articles

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