Where is The Open Championship 2021 Played? Location, Yardage, and Major Details About the Venue

Published 07/14/2021, 7:30 AM EDT
Golf – The 149th Open Championship – Royal St George’s, Sandwich, Britain – July 13, 2021 Bryson DeChambeau of the U.S. and caddie during a practice round REUTERS/Paul Childs


The final major championship of the year is all set to commence on July 15th. The Open Championship will begin at the Royal St. George’s Sandwich, Kent, England, and the tournament has some of the best players on the field. So here’s everything you need to know about the venue hosting the 149th Open Championship. 

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The Royal St. George’s is a small and straightforward course compared to the other major championship venues. But don’t let the size fool you, as it can play as one of the most demanding courses, and scoring can become a headache. This is the 15th Open Championship at this venue, with the last played in 2011. The total measurement of the course is 7,207 yards with a combined par of 70. 

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What are the challenges at Royal St. George’s?

Golf – The 149th Open Championship – Royal St George’s, Sandwich, Britain – July 13, 2021 Gary Wiren of the U.S, in action during a practice round REUTERS/Paul Childs

The primary challenge at the Royal St. George’s is the wind. The difficulty of the course will mainly depend on the weather and wind that nature will provide throughout the week. This seaside golf course is known for its wild winds that can affect the scoring immensely. 

Apart from the winds, the ever-present deep bunkers on almost every hole apart from the third will make things difficult for players. The roughs are thick, and the ball might come out super dead with no distance. So remaining in the fairway is imperative for players. But a straight shot off the tee doesn’t guaranty a good lie as the undulations present on the fairways can roll the ball or create an awkward lie. 

The two par-3s, 3rd, and 11th will play on a bit of a longer side. These two holes are stretching out to nearly 240 yards. So getting out of these holes with a par will be a success for players.

The demanding holes on the course

Golf – The 149th Open Championship – Royal St George’s, Sandwich, Britain – July 13, 2021 Open Championship flags are seen during a practice round REUTERS/Paul Childs

The most demanding hole on the course in the previous championships has been the par-4, 8th hole. It has two bunkers protecting the right side of the fairway and each side of the green. The accuracy of the approach shot is impeccable to avoid the swathe of rough and dunes.  

Moreover, the opening hole is also quite challenging. The par-4, 445 yards hole has a deep swale in the fairway and a trio of bunkers around the greens. Tiger Woods started with a seven on this hole in 2003 after losing his tee shot in the deep rough and eventually lost the event by two strokes. 

And finally, the par-4, 18th hole. This hole had only 32 birdies and 165 bogeys or worse across four rounds in the 2011 Open Championship. The 450-yard last hole has bunkers on both sides of the fairway, and with undulating green, the approach has never been straightforward. So this will be an accurate test, and whoever finishes at the top will be the champion golfer on Sunday. 

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Complete yardage of Royal St. George’s; the host of 2021 The Open Championship

Here’s the complete yardage of Royal St. George’s Golf Course:

HoleParYards
14445
24421
33239
44491
54422
63174
75566
84450
94412
Out353620
104415
113238
124397
134456
145547
154496
163162
174426
184450
In353587
Total707207

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Amey Kulkarni

137 articles

Amey Kulkarni is a Golf writer at EssentiallySports. He is currently pursuing his Bachelor’s degree in mass media. Before joining EssentiallySports he used to write articles on Golf and Cricket on his personal blog cricgolf.

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