Lewis Hamilton
India.com

In simple words, if F1 has become somewhat boring, then perhaps Lewis Hamilton deserves a fair share of that blame. Do you know why? Guess!? Won’t cost you many a brain cell for this one or too much time.

After all, in Lewis Hamilton’s ebb rest five-world championships, 78 Grand Prix wins, and now, the way he is going, then 3 back-to-back world titles. There are consistent drivers, there are very consistent ones, and then there are the chosen few who are in a league of their own. Lewis Hamilton belongs to this rare third category.

He’s a driver par excellence. He’s quick, audacious, extremely focused and fit. And the way he’s gone about his business in the past half a decade, it may not be entirely incorrect to state that he’s gone on to establish his reign of sorts. In fact, so utterly brilliant has this man from Stevenage, United Kingdom been that if he doesn’t happen to win a Grand Prix, then you are more likely to feel that something’s amiss in the top echelons of F1.

Actually, where the past serves a reminder, then only a Michael Schumacher represented unprecedented authority in Formula 1. Today, a few years later, Lewis Hamilton is showing absolute class and commitment, so much so that no other team other than the Silver Arrows have claimed the world championship crown (even once) since the onset of the 2014 F1 season.

But all of this brilliance has sort of made Formula 1 a one-sided narrative, something that’s utterly counter-productive where its fan-following and the ability to serve a multiple geographies stand.

So what can be done, one asks?

To that end, none other than Lewis Hamilton himself has shared an insight. He happens to believe that in order to make F1 break the wall of monotony, what’s needed (now, more than ever) is a remarkable overhaul.

But what is the point that Hamilton is trying to make?

We need to see a dramatic overhaul,” he said, adding that the structure of the sport’s management was also in need of change.

He added: “It’s really important that people realize it’s not the drivers’ fault -– this is a constant cycle of F1 for years and years. And before I got to F1. It’s because the way Bernie (Ecclestone) had it set up and the decisions they made then.

“Until that structure changes, it will be the same in my opinion.” He was also of the view that certain tracks, given the way they are structured, more or less, end up delivering honestly dull races.

He would add the following:

“I hear you and from a fans’ perspective I get it,” he said, “But I think it’s an unfair question because what would you do in our shoes? You would continue to push relentlessly for performance. It is what we do.

“But the fans see a race that is less enjoyable to watch.”