Netflix CEO Teases Huge F1 News Following Drive to Survive’s Success

Published 09/22/2021, 7:08 AM EDT
Formula One F1 – Italian Grand Prix – Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Monza, Italy – September 12, 2021 McLaren’s Daniel Ricciardo leads during the race REUTERS/Jennifer Lorenzini


Netflix has been bringing in a lot of content for Formula 1 fans. The recent Schumacher documentary comes after the announcement of season 4 of Drive to survive. These shows are not only reinforcing the fan base but also bringing in an influx of new F1 fans. All that’s left for the streaming service is to stream the races live. Unsure about bringing this to life, Netflix’s CEO explains the situation.

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Reed Hastings, the co-founder of Netflix, explains his plan on bidding for streaming rights from F1. “A few years ago the rights to Formula 1 were sold. At that time we were not among the bidders. Today we would think about it.”

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However, the American businessman isn’t completely sure he will go through with the idea. “Entertainment and not journalism that should have certain standards and follow ethical principles. We also keep our hands off live sports.” 

From a business standpoint, sports broadcasting would be difficult. “With sports broadcasts, we have no control over the source… this type of control would be a prerequisite for us so that we can offer our customers a can make a secure offer.”

The streaming F1 races on Netflix will increase accessibility and therefore, bring in more fans; however, it seems like a distant possibility.

F1 embraces Drive to Survive

Over the course of the last three years, Drive to Survive has reeled in a larger than before fanbase for the sport. Almost like a large, revolutionary ad campaign, the show doesn’t focus much on the cars, as it does on the drama behind the scenes; the factor that attracts its viewers.

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After a dry spell of drama, where Schumacher, Hamilton, and Vettel calmly dominated the sport, things picked up pace around 2017; Liberty Media got its streaming rights and opened a new window for the sport.

Formula One F1 – Italian Grand Prix – Autodromo Nazionale Monza, Monza, Italy – September 11, 2021 General view during the sprint qualifying REUTERS/Jennifer Lorenzini

Ross Brawn commented on welcoming this new change to the sport. “what I see is this sort of new world of F1 having effects in all sorts of ways. Social media has exploded in F1, it was very small five years ago.”

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As the sport continues to evolve and the thrill of watching the drivers race catches the attention of more people around the globe, F1 only promises to get more appealing.

Watch this story: Toto Wolff Swears, Valtteri Bottas Bares: Funniest Moments From Drive to Survive

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Shreya Sanjeev

447 articles

Shreya Sanjeev is an F1 author at EssentiallySports. Having attained a journalism degree from St Xavier's College, she finds comfort in the sound of her keyboard while typing and excitement in the sound of F1 cars speeding on a track. A street circuit and Daniel Ricciardo fan through and through, Shreya claims the 2018 Monaco GP to be one of her favorite races of all time.

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