How Many Stadiums Does French Open 2021 Have?

Published 05/29/2021, 5:34 AM EDT
PARIS, FRANCE – JUNE 09: A general view inside Court Philippe Chatrier during the ladies singles final between Sloane Stephens of The United States and Simona Halep of Romania during day fourteen of the 2018 French Open at Roland Garros on June 9, 2018 in Paris, France. (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)


As we inch closer to the French Open 2021, players are training intensely for the second Grand Slam tournament of the season.

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The French Open is held in the city of Paris and this year will be conducted from 31st of May and the winners will be revealed by the 13th of June. 

Since the French Open 2021 is held at Roland Garros, let’s take a look at the various stadiums in which the matches will be played. There are 4 stadiums, the Court Philippe Chatrier, the Court Suzanne Lenglen, the Court Simonne Mathieu.

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PARIS, FRANCE – JUNE 11: A general view inside Court Philippe Chatrier during the mens singles final between Rafael Nadal of Spain and Stan Wawrinka of Switzerland on day fifteen of the 2017 French Open at Roland Garros on June 11, 2017 in Paris, France. (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images)

Court Philippe Chatrier is the center court at the French Open 2021

The Court Philippe Chatrier was built in 1928 and is the center court at Roland Garros. It has a capacity of 15,225 spectators; it was renovated in 2019.

When the 2018 French Open was over, the entire stadium was demolished and rebuilt within a year before the 2019 edition. Last year, they added a retractable roof and floodlights, which helped them play matches during the evenings. 

The Court Suzanne Lenglen was built in 1994 and was termed as ‘Court A’. It is the secondary stadium at the French Open and has a seating capacity of 10,068 spectators. It was named after the former French tennis player Suzanne Lenglen.

Each year, the winner of the women’s event is handed the ‘La Coupe Suzanne Lenglen’ trophy. Interestingly, the court has an underground irrigation system that helps control the moisture levels within the surface. 

General view inside Court Philippe-Chatrier during the Women’s Singles first round match between Anett Kontaveit of Estonia and Caroline Garcia of France during day one of the 2020 French Open at Roland Garros on September 27, 2020 in Paris, France. (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)

Court Simonne Mathieu is the third most important court at the French Open 2021

The Court Simonne Mathieu is a 5000-seater stadium that was completed in 2019. It was named after the 1938 and 1939 women’s champion, who was also remembered as a leader during the Second World War. This court was constructed four meters below ground level, having greenhouses on all sides. 

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These courts have witnessed some of the greatest matches in the history of the sport. Over the years, there have been a number of famous personalities that have attended matches on these courts. 

Spain’s Rafael Nadal has been the player that has enjoyed tremendous success at this venue. He has lifted 13 Grand Slam titles here and he looks to add to his existing tally. It will be interesting to see how the proceedings get underway as the French Open 2021 inches closer.

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Rohan Kollare

731 articles

Rohan Kollare is a tennis author for EssentiallySports. Rohan has a post-graduate diploma in Sports Management and a trophy cabinet adorned with accolades won in district and state-level tennis competitions. He has previously worked in Content Operations for Disney’s Hotstar for over a year, covering tennis and Formula One.

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