How Much Do Wimbledon Championships Tickets Cost?

Published 06/15/2021, 6:58 AM EDT
LONDON – JUNE 24: Flowers show the Wimbledon logo during previews for the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on June 24, 2007 in London, England. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)


Tennis is a vintage sport that has been played since the 19th century. It originated in England and one of the oldest, most esteemed tournaments to be played as part of this sport is the Wimbledon Championships. It is played on the traditional grass courts and has been in existence since 1877. 

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Wimbledon is a magnanimous event as fans from all over the world flock to attend it over the course of a fortnight. There are many peculiar aspects of this tournament and one in particular that stands out is the ticketing system and its pricing. At Wimbledon, a unique system of issuing tickets by a public ballot is followed.

A general view inside the Wimbledon Number 1 court with the new fixed and retractable roof after the Wimbledon Spring Press Conference 2019 at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on April 30, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

This is held at the beginning of the year and has been a constant practice since 1924. However, due to the ongoing war with coronavirus, the usual method has been scrapped. This year, the tickets have been issued online and have been made available from mid-June. 

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Pricing for the tickets at the Wimbledon Championships 2021 season

The price for the tickets for the men’s final this season begins at £240. For the lower courts, the cost is £44, and the most reasonable Centre Court ticket for the two weeks is priced at £70. Normally, the women’s singles final ticket prices start at £200 while you can buy the men’s singles’ final ticket for £250. However, circumstances are different this year. 

Usually, there is a queue every season, which is a trend followed at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club. Nonetheless, to keep up with the social distancing norms, this system has been scrapped this season. The main mode of availability of tickets is online. 

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LONDON, ENGLAND – JULY 12: Roger Federer of Switzerland shakes hands with Rafael Nadal of Spain after defeating him in the Men’s Singles Semi Final at The Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championship at the All England Lawn and Tennis Club at Wimbledon on July 12, 2019 in London, England. (Photo by Simon Bruty/Anychance/Getty Images)

Rules are different this year due to changed circumstances

Although the event was canceled last season, fans holding the tickets sold last year will be given first preference. Organizers are keeping all doors open regarding changing circumstances that may lead to an increase or decrease in attendance. 

The majority of the tournaments over the last 12 months have been functioning with local guidelines subject to a curfew, depending on the venue, and avoiding large crowds.

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However, in a recent positive development, officials revealed that for the men’s and women’s finals this year they will allow 100% capacity for spectators in the stadium. 

The 2021 Wimbledon Championships will begin on June 28 and will end on July 11. This event was the only Grand Slam that was canceled last year. Players such as Roger Federer and Serena Williams will be cheered for on their favorite surfaces. It will be interesting to see how the two weeks unfold. 

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Watch this story: Novak Djokovic’s Reaction when he couldn’t handle Rafael Nadal’s game

 

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Rohan Kollare

1063 articles

Rohan Kollare is a tennis author for EssentiallySports. Rohan has a post-graduate diploma in Sports Management and a trophy cabinet adorned with accolades won in district and state-level tennis competitions. He has previously worked in Content Operations for Disney’s Hotstar for over a year, covering tennis and Formula One.

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