FIA
image source: GP Blog

There’s never a dull day in the life of Formula 1- right? Accidents, unpredictable wins, shattering losses, strange Grands Prix events; often marked by rains, often truncated by inclement weather- anything and everything can be expected in the top echelons of motor-racing.

At the same time, the responsibility of ensuring a simple but burly task that all races occur sans any discrepancies and in accordance with pre-set rules ensures that the FIA has its task cut out for them, arduous that it may be.

On these lines, when it became apparent that immediate solutions had to be sought for aerodynamic rule changes, as introduced by the sport in 2019- the FIA was on its way again.

And just what exactly had happened?

Well, in lines with the new rule changes that made it difficult for drivers to see the starting lights (the five red lights), a solution, it became obvious, had to be sought.

Actually, both Pierre Gasly and Robert Kubica from Red Bull Racing and Williams Racing respectively had complained that they were unable to see the starting lights at Melbourne’s Albert Park.

This was due to an increase in the size of the rear wing. One mustn’t forget that due to the fact that owing to the car’s being barely inches above the ground, it anyways isn’t easy for F1 cars to be able to view the lights.

Think F1 is easy, well this issue proved it more complicated than ever.

To elaborate, Robert Kubica, who failed to score points anyways, complained that due to Carlos Sainz Jr.’s McLaren being just in front of him on the starting grid, it became literally impossible for the Spaniard to view the lights gantry.

To quote GPblog.com on the developing story, the F1 Group is now working on a solution to the problem that can be implemented in time for the Bahrain Grand Prix.