Nadeshot Invites Controversy With His $100K Call of Duty: Warzone Tournament; Compensates NRG Isaac and Breadman With Cryptocurrency

Published 05/20/2021, 9:12 AM EDT


No Call of Duty: Warzone tournament would be complete without some drama or hacking issues. Similarly, Nadeshot’s $100K Warzone Invitational also invited some spicy controversy recently. In fact, it was the 100 Thieves owner himself who gave rise to the controversy due to his lack of knowledge of the rules of his own tournament.

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The drama occurred during game 3 of the winners’ round 2, a highly anticipated and crucial round. The winners of this round get a direct entry in the top 3. Naturally, the stakes were extremely high, and no one would want any slip-ups in such a round. As a result, things got heated when NRG’s Isaac and Breadman sabotaged FaZe’s Kris “Swagg” Lamberson and Booya.

Booya cries foul being unaware of the Call of Duty: Warzone tournament rules

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NRG Isaac made sure to ask the rules surrounding sabotage which the tournament organizers made public on the Discord server. Knowing that if a player hops into his chopper, he can very much go ahead and crash them without it qualifying as sabotage. Therefore, Isaac used this strategy multiple times in the tournament. However, things didn’t go as well when he did the same to Booya.

As soon as Booya died after Isaac crashed him into a building, he quit the lobby and cried foul. Even though the TOs declared the rules before, Nadeshot stepped in to resolve the issue. The Call of Duty: Warzone community was shocked when the 100 Thieves owner ruled it to be a rematch.

The results of the rematch were completely opposite of what the fans had expected. The match that Isaac and Breadman would have easily won, went into the hands of Booya and FaZe Swagg, who secured an entry into the top 3.

ALSO READ: Is Dr Disrespect Joining 100 Thieves?

Nadeshot apologizes for being unaware of his own tournament rules

Nadeshot’s ruling over the dispute ended deeply upsetting Isaac, who made sure he followed tournament rules to the letter. However, instead of taking into account the participants, the 100T owner took a commercial decision. He felt that such a crucial round has the ability to have a nail-biting finish, and he didn’t want it to go to waste.

Obviously like, one of the most important rounds…Really what I wanted to see was not game 3 end within the first minute because Booya left the game. He should have never left. But from an entertainment purposes or perspective, you don’t want to see a game 3 end because somebody leaves the game.”

Nadeshot’s disregard for the rules just to please the tournament audience did not settle in well with Isaac and Breadman. The duo took to Twitter to justify their stance with most of the Call of Duty: Warzone community siding with them. Naturally, with the amount of attention the matter received, Nadeshot finally decided to apologize and compensate the affected party.

“From my perspective, I haven’t been reading the rules from top to bottom. I’ve just been coming here as a broadcaster and a commentator. I am the host, though, so it is my responsibility. So, I’d like to apologize for not knowing the rules.”

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The 100 Thieves owner will be compensating both NRG Isaac and Breadman in Bitcoin to make up for his slip-up. While not the ideal choice of compensation, considering the recent cryptocurrency crash, it did manage to settle the issue for the time being. As for the tournament, NRG HusKerrs and Newbzz ended up taking their share of the $100K home.

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ALSO READ: Call of Duty: Warzone- The ZRG Might Soon Take Over the Sniper Meta

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Shwetang Parthsarthy

822 articles

Shwetang Parthsarthy is an eSports author at EssentiallySports. His love for arguments and games has led him down two paths: being a law student and writing about the world of gaming since 2017. What started as a teenage hobby in the relatively small mobile gaming world with FPS games like Critical Ops and Call of Duty: Mobile, has grown into a professional pursuit with EssentiallySports.

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