Corey LaJoie Delivers Good News for Smaller Teams in Big Boost to Revolutionary NASCAR Changes

Published 10/13/2021, 2:56 PM EDT
FORT WORTH, TX – MARCH 31: Corey LaJoie, driver of the #32 PROSPR Ford, is introduced prior to the Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series O’Reilly Auto Parts 500 at Texas Motor Speedway on March 31, 2019 in Fort Worth, Texas. (Photo by Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images)


Following the Cup Series race at the Charlotte Motor Speedway Roval, a few drivers and teams stayed back. This was because, there was yet another Next Gen car test. Corey LaJoie was one of a few drivers who had runs at the Roval. Needless to say, the driver thoroughly enjoyed his stint on the track.

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The main purpose of this test was to confirm the rules package for the new season. LaJoie wrote on Twitter, “First day recap: Everything is new. Sequential shifters are awesome. The cars look super cool. There are some bugs to work out. These cars will give small teams a MUCH bigger chance to be competitive than I anticipated.”

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What awaits Corey LaJoie and his contemporaries next season?

LaJoie competed on the opening day of a two-day test at the Charlotte Motor Speedway Roval. With this, he and his fellow drivers are steadily painting a clearer picture of what to expect in the 2022 season. All that was the result of several hours of on-track shakedowns.

CONCORD, NORTH CAROLINA – MAY 24: Corey LaJoie, driver of the #32 ARK.io Ford, exits his car during qualifying for the NASCAR Cup Series Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, North Carolina. (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)

Recently, NASCAR senior vice president of racing innovation John Probst, provided several updates on the car’s progress. Among them, he talked about the rules packages that will be in effect next year.

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First and foremost, the officials are working on analysing the car’s crashworthiness. Other objectives include the car’s ability to disperse heat in the cockpit and iron out complaints of steering vibrations.

According to reports, teams are targeting an engine output of 670 horsepower. However, this will only be needed for road-course events, short tracks and ovals like Nashville and Darlington.

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In addition to that, the cars will also sport a rear spoiler height of 4 inches for those races. Meanwhile at the remaining tracks, teams will target around 550 horsepower and run an 8-inch spoiler. Though it is worth mentioning that nothing has been decided for the likes of Daytona and Talladega.

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WATCH: Corey LaJoie Gets a Big Shock on Seeing a NASCAR Truck on Race Track

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Dhruv George

12102 articles

Dhruv George is a senior Motorsports author for EssentiallySports, having authored nearly 12000 articles spanning different sports like F1, NASCAR, Tennis, NFL, and eSports. He graduated with a PG Diploma in Journalism from the Xavier Institute of Communications. Dhruv has also conducted interviews with F1 driver Pierre Gasly and Moto2 rider Tony Arbolino.

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