1970 Mustang Boss That Saved Ford’s Eviction From NASCAR Using Chrysler’s Fighter Plane Engine Tech, Valued Around $350,000, on Sale

Published 11/20/2023, 6:19 PM EST

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Though all Mustangs on the track did not have a great season in 2023, one did end up winning the championship courtesy of Ryan Blaney. But where did all this glory for the Mustangs in NASCAR begin? In impeccable timing of a modern-day Mustang clinching a championship, its forefather, the 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 429, has now powered itself up from the depths of history to remind us who is, in fact, the boss.

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The historical 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 429 resurfaces to the modern world

Every piece of groundbreaking innovation is born out of a landlocked problem. Back in 1964, when Chrysler launched their 426 HEMI V8 for NASCAR, Ford was facing such a problem. Their cars were starting to lose credibility and were simply unable to keep up with the Chryslers. Ford had to move quickly if they wanted to stay relevant. The answer from the company was the massive 429 V8 engine, nicknamed “The Boss”.

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But the hurdle was using the same engine that they built for NASCAR, in 500 of their production cars. Not wanting to lose time, they put the beastly racing engine into the 1969 Mustang Fastback and drove them to showrooms. These cars today are some of the rarest since only 1,359 of them were ever produced. And one of these 1,359, has now bolstered out of its hiding place in some fashion.

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The auction house Barrett-Jackson has announced that a 1970 Mustang Boss 429 in their possession is available for bidding in their 2024 Scottsdale Auction. The model that they have advertised carries the serial number KK NASCAR #2245, and is one of the 62 429s that were painted in the Grabber Blue scheme with an all-black interior. In the past, these Ford Mustang Boss cars have been sold for $350,000.

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The unique characteristics that make the Boss 429 a beast on roads

The Boss 429 was never intended for profit-making purposes. The only goal that the engine had was to put Chrysler’s 426 HEMI V8 in the mud. The HEMI engine uses a hemispherical combustion chamber that facilitates minimal power loss due to heat. It also gives engine valves extra space making it easier for them to breathe. Notably, this mechanism was also used by Chrysler in the fighter planes of World War 2.

When Ford began getting battered down in NASCAR, they were keen to adopt a similar kind of technology. In a small change, they used semi-hemispherical combustion chambers and installed bigger valves. In order to accommodate such a large engine, several other elements of the car were reworked by Kar Kraft. Better suspension, improved exhausts, Hurst shifter, and the massive head scoop were all just some of them.

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If there is a “king” for all the Mustangs, it has to be the Boss 429. The incredibly powerful engines were way overpowered with a horsepower of nearly 500. The 4-speed manual car that is now open to bid on Barrett-Jackson’s website would be any car collector’s dream.

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Written by:

Gowtham Ramalingam

365Articles

One take at a time

Hello, there! Though my affinity for racing originally stemmed from the European circuits of Formula 1 as a teen, I unexpectedly found myself drawn to NASCAR's unparalleled excitement growing up. This sport took hold of me and never let go, leading me to a career as a NASCAR writer. Over the last few months, I’ve had the chance to share my insights and observations through a myriad of articles on EssentiallySports.
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Edited by:

Ranvijay Singh

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