Aaron Rodgers Talks About the One Thing Quarterbacks Must Do to Change Their Throwing Form

Published 01/07/2021, 7:52 AM EST
Sep 13, 2020; Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (12) passes in the second quarter against the Minnesota Vikings at U.S. Bank Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Brad Rempel-USA TODAY Sports


Aaron Rodgers is currently in his 16th season in the NFL. While he started off as back up to legendary Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett Favre, Rodgers has now firmly established himself as a Packers legend as well.

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A 2-time league MVP, Aaron Rodgers is often viewed by many as one of the most prolific passers of the football. With multiple Hail Marys to his name, Rodgers has produced countless memorable plays in the NFL.

One factor which differentiates the quarterback from his contemporaries is his dart-like throwing technique. It is something that he has worked on specifically over the years.

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Even 10,000 throws might not be enough- Aaron Rodgers

During a segment of the Pat McAfee Show, Rodgers, when asked about whether he could change his throwing style now, said that while it’s not impossible, it’s not an easy task either.

“It’s tough. It’s really tough. Malcolm Gladwell talks about how you have to do something 10,000 times to become an expert in it. 10,000 throws is a lot of throws. And I think if you’ve banked 50 to 100,000 throws doing it a certain way. 10,000 isn’t going to be enough to change it,” Rodgers said.

Dec 6, 2020; Green Bay, WI, USA; Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (12) looks to pass to running back Jamaal Williams (30) against the Philadelphia Eagles during their football game Sunday, December 6, 2020, at Lambeau Field in Green Bay, Wis. Mandatory Credit: Dan Powers-USA TODAY NETWORK
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Rodgers also talked about the need of using special equipment to avoid repeating an old action.

“Don’t know how unless you fit yourself upon some sort of harness that gets you in a certain way. I think it’s hard to kind of break ingrained muscle memory that’s why I always tell young quarterbacks that…exaggerating fundamentals in the drill work is the only way anything can carry over to the active live situations,” he said.

“Because you have to overdo it in order for something to click in when you’re in those live drills to be able to change things. So for me, it was, it was exaggerating, maybe my hitch.”

Exaggerating the fundamentals key to success according to Aaron Rodgers

Aaron Rodgers had undergone a change in throwing style since his days in college. The one key factor that he emphasized on back then to make the transition was focusing on exaggerating the fundamentals.

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“That’s one thing that’s really helped me, I think over the years was exaggerating all the little things in order for something to kind of click in,” he said.

Cal quarterback Aaron Rodgers passed for 275 yards as the California Golden Bears defeated the Oregon Ducks 28 to 27 at Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, California, November 6, 2004. (Photo by Robert B. Stanton/WireImage)

“When you’re out there just playing, you’re going to revert back to your normal muscle memory… You know, just throwing a certain way over time is not going to change you. It has to be exaggerated, for there to be meaningful change.”

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Rodgers who is chasing a 3rd MVP title this season is one of the best at what he does. While the Green Bay Packers quarterback has perfected the art of throwing the ball, his tip provides vital insight for young quarterbacks trying to improve their game.

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Shivayan Roy

1068 articles

Shivayan Roy is currently an NFL writer at EssentiallySports. After completing his Masters Diploma in Journalism from the Asian College of Journalism, Roy functioned as a reporter for Goal.com and extensively covered the FIFA U-17 World Cup.

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