How Many mph Can Olympics Legend Usain Bolt Run?

Published 07/12/2021, 2:07 PM EDT
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – AUGUST 18: Usain Bolt of Jamaica celebrates winning the Men’s 200m Final on Day 13 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Stadium on August 18, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)


Usain Bolt dominated the tracks for most of his career in the Olympics. Competing across 3 different editions of the event, he was unmatched in speed and was always ahead of the rest. The Jamaican quickly emerged as the greatest of all time on the tracks, setting new world records for both the 100m and 200m races. 

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Throughout his Olympic Career, Bolt amassed a total of eight gold medals, owing to his victories in the 100m, 200m, and 4x100m relay events at the Olympics. In his prime, no one in history could say they were faster than Bolt and he made that point fairly clear by the way he ran. 

BEIJING – AUGUST 20: Usain Bolt of Jamaica reacts after breaking the world record with a time of 19.30 to win the gold medal in the Men’s 200m Final ahead of Churandy Martina of Netherlands Antilles Brian Dzingai of Zimbabwe and Shawn Crawford of the United States at the National Stadium during Day 12 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 20, 2008 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images)

Now that all is said and done, the question does arise- How fast was Usain Bolt? The athlete was obviously the fastest to ever do it and did set new records that no one has come close to breaking. But what was his exact speed on the tracks? 

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In 2011, Belgian scientists decided to measure this number and judge Bolt on his speeds through various parts of the track in the 100m race. When he hit top speed, the scientists found that he hit 43.99 Kilometers per hour, which is 27.33 miles per hour!

Usain Bolt hit this speed 67.13 meters into the race and finished with a winning time of 9.76 seconds. 27.33 mph is a staggering number, and is actually higher than the speed limit in some streets for vehicles! What’s even more staggering is that this wasn’t even his fastest race. 

Usain Bolt’s speed in 2009 would have been much faster

In 2009, at the IAFF World Championships, the Jamaican set a new world record for the 100m sprint, clocking in at an insane 9.58 seconds. His speed during this race would have been more undoubtedly, which is something interesting to imagine. 

The human body is capable of running up to 40 mph, although no one has touched that speed yet. The reason for this is that the 40 mph number is based on the perfect body type required for running the race and depends on the optimum contracting fibers in our muscles to move at that speed. 

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Usain Bolt is the fastest to have done it and defies everything in that as well. For his body frame- tall and lean, Bolt shouldn’t even be able to run that fast. His body and its work rate it truly phenomenal. The archetype athlete would be shorter and have muscles loaded with twitch fibers for acceleration. 

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – AUGUST 17: Andre de Grasse of Canada (L) and Usain Bolt of Jamaica (C) react as they compete in the Men’s 200m Semifinals on Day 12 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Stadium on August 17, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Shaun Botterill/Getty Images)

Although he has retired now from the tracks, Bolt has left antra of dominance in his wake. The records he set for the 100m and 200m will be a challenge to break and only s truly gifted athlete will be able to break it. 

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Luke Dias

1485 articles

Luke Dias is a senior WWE and AEW author at EssentiallySports, having published more than 1000 articles on professional wrestling. Having completed courses in Advanced Writing from the University of California and Media and Ethics from the University of Amsterdam, Luke is currently pursuing an undergraduate degree in Journalism from Xavier’s College. His tremendous knowledge of WWE history enables him to make past connections, adding depth to the articles.

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