Japan Restarts Dormant Nuclear Reactor for Tokyo Olympics 2020 Cooling

Published 07/21/2021, 9:10 AM EDT


The heat seems to be getting the better of athletes at Tokyo right before the start of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. With temperatures exceeding 90 degrees Fahrenheit, there has been a growing demand for cooling services at the Olympics village.

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And to keep up with the growing demand, Japanese authorities need to go the extra mile to produce more power. Lots of it. After the nation suffered a major power crisis in winter, authorities are making sure that they can keep up with the growing demand. 

And they’re doing just that by relying on nuclear energy. 

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Tokyo Olympics fueled by Nuclear Power 

In an effort to keep up with the growing power demand, Japan has restarted a number of power plants. And among those, one is nuclear. 

A few weeks earlier, Kansai Electric Power restarted a long-dormant nuclear reactor. The reactor is the first to have been restarted in the country since the start of the year.

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Currently, the nation has nine full-functional reactors. Making sure to leave no stone unturned, the deputy director of the industry ministry’s office of electricity supply policy told Reuters that they are confident no power crisis will affect the event. 

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“We are not worried about power supply during the summer as the restarts of extra power plants have boosted capacity,” said Ito. 

The giant Olympic rings are seen through a tree in the dusk at the waterfront area of Odaiba Marine Park. The picture was taken before the opening ceremony of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. REUTERS/Issei Kato

The country is still heavily reliant on fossil fuels. Fuels such as liquefied natural gas and coal which it has to import to meet rising demands. Being a nation that is fast urbanizing, the demand for power has never been higher. 

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And with Japan experiencing heat-stroke like conditions, it’s normal to believe that the demand for power will go up. Providing power to massive establishments like the Olympics village, event venues and other places related to the games, the authorities will have to buckle up for what is to come.  

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Shivayan Roy

919 articles

Shivayan Roy is currently an NFL writer at EssentiallySports. After completing his Masters Diploma in Journalism from the Asian College of Journalism, Roy functioned as a reporter for Goal.com and extensively covered the FIFA U-17 World Cup.

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