“They Will Schedule Their Life Around Yours”- Ninja on How He Deals With the Pressures of Streaming

Published 03/25/2021, 1:34 PM EDT
SAN JOSE, CA – OCTOBER 27: Tyler “Ninja” Blevins prepares to play Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 in the Doritos Bowl 2018 at TwitchCon 2018 in the San Jose Convention Center on October 27, 2018 in San Jose, California. (Photo by Robert Reiners/Getty Images)


The most-followed Twitch streamer, Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, has started a new segment on his streams to answer fan questions. He recently posted the first episode on his YouTube channel where he opened up a bit more about his life. Tyler touched on various personal topics; however, the most interesting was when he talked about how he keeps his mental health intact.

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Ninja’s fan, Leah asked, “How do you take time for your own mental health so as to practice self-care while being a full-time streamer?” In reply to her question, Ninja talked about a few important things every streamer should keep in mind.

Tyler said that the biggest advantage of being a streamer is he gets to pick his hours. Naturally, this automatically takes a lot of pressure off streamers as they don’t have to follow a rigid schedule. However, he also warned upcoming streamers always to be upfront with their fans.

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SAN JOSE, CA – OCTOBER 27: Tyler “Ninja” Blevins stands in between games during the Doritos Bowl 2018 at TwitchCon 2018 in the San Jose Convention Center on October 27, 2018 in San Jose, California. (Photo by Robert Reiners/Getty Images)

Ninja advised upcoming streamers that they should always let fans know if they aren’t feeling like streaming instead of apologizing later.

I’m so sorry. I had to go to the hospital and take time off. I’m sorry. It’s like, why the f*** are we Sorry? Why are we apologizing for missing a day or two of streaming?

Ninja advises consistent streamers to take time off for themselves

Replying to the same question, Ninja talked about how much better it is being a YouTuber as compared to a streamer. Instead of having to show up in front of the camera every day, YouTubers can record a set of videos in one or two days and take some time off.

Naturally, spending 6-10 hours streaming live every day is going to drain people mentally. Ninja encourages streamers to communicate with their audience. He feels that after a long week of streaming, streamers can let their fans know that they are taking the weekend off.

SAN JOSE, CA – OCTOBER 27: Tyler “Ninja” Blevins plays Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 during the Doritos Bowl 2018 at TwitchCon 2018 in the San Jose Convention Center on October 27, 2018, in San Jose, California. (Photo by Robert Reiners/Getty Images)

According to Tyler, consistent streamers do not have to worry about bleeding audiences. Their months and years of grind have already helped them build a loyal fanbase.

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Because guess what, people plan for your streams, if you’re a great streamer, and if you’re consistent, people will literally make time for your stream, they will schedule their life around yours so like, it kind of is important to let people know what’s going on.

Clearly, Ninja doesn’t want streamers to end up being exhausted and quit because the activity feels like a burden. Therefore, he recommends breaks and communication with fans as the mantra to having a relaxed and successful streaming career. If this is the advice Tyler has followed to gain over 16 million followers, surely others can at least touch a fraction of that number.

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ALSO READ: Ninja vs. Shroud: Who Got the Shorter End of the Twitch Comeback Stick?

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Shwetang Parthsarthy

739 articles

Shwetang Parthsarthy is an eSports author at EssentiallySports. His love for arguments and games has led him down two paths: being a law student and writing about the world of gaming since 2017. What started as a teenage hobby in the relatively small mobile gaming world with FPS games like Critical Ops and Call of Duty: Mobile, has grown into a professional pursuit with EssentiallySports.

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