Olympic Legend Usain Bolt Claims a Two-Week Gym Break Is Crucial to His Speed

Published 10/29/2021, 8:42 AM EDT
BEIJING, CHINA – AUGUST 27: Usain Bolt of Jamaica celebrates after crossing the finish line to win gold in the Men’s 200 metres final during day six of the 15th IAAF World Athletics Championships Beijing 2015 at Beijing National Stadium on August 27, 2015 in Beijing, China. (Photo by Alexander Hassenstein/Getty Images for IAAF)


6’5″ Usain Bolt has a terrific body, something he has worked on for years, consequently establishing his legacy as the world’s fastest man. Till date, no athlete has surpassed the GOAT’s world records in 100m and 200m.

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

The Olympic gold medalist might have retired from the track now, but his name is still on the top. It is the courtesy of his unbelievable accomplishments in track and field sport. Though the 8-time Olympic gold medalist has to work hard to maintain his physique, there is a limit to which sprinters can work out and discipline their bodies.

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

Usain Bolt had to stop working out for two weeks

People might have expected Bolt to train and work out all day. But muscle building is more strategical and sensitive, and athletes and trainers closely monitor their growth.

Bolt revealed having muscles has its own drawbacks. If it gets too tight, it might hamper a sprinter’s performance. The Jamaican sprinter said that his trainer, Glen Mills, would put a pause of two weeks on workouts when his muscles started getting tight.

Usain Bolt of Jamaica reacts as he wins the Olympic mens 200m final in a new world record time in the Birds Nest stadium, Beijing on August 20th 2008 in Beijing, China (Photo by Tom Jenkins/Getty Images). An image from the book “In The Moment” published June 2012

“If you get too big, then your muscles get too tight. And if your muscles get too tight, there’s one of two things that’s going to happen. Either you’re going to get injured or you’re going to slow down. We would take two weeks from the gym just to re-tone.”

It’s not just Bolt, but some other sprinters have also talked about controlling the growth of muscles. One of the notable names is US sprinting legend, Carl Lewis.

Carl Lewis thinks new-age athletes lift too much

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

Ten times Olympic medalist, Carl Lewis, spoke about new-age athletes focusing on being bulky. He believes that though the youngsters are increasing their muscle mass; they are losing their flexibility.

LOS ANGELES – AUGUST 11: Carl Lewis #915 of the USA runs the anchor leg of the Men’s 4x100m relay race of the Track and Field competition of the 1984 Olympic Games held on August 11, 1984 in the Los Angeles Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by David Madison/Getty Images)

He had even said that weight training isn’t a priority for sprinters. Indeed, sprinting is an intense sport, and there are a lot of strategies involved to complete a 100m race in 10 seconds or fewer!

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

Do you think new-age sprinters are changing the world of track and field with their strategies?

DIVE DEEPER

4 Years After Retirement, Usain Bolt Finally Reveals Why He Lost His Last Race

about 1 month ago

SHARE THIS ARTICLE :

ADVERTISEMENT

Shreya Verma

424 articles

Shreya Verma is a US Sports writer at EssentiallySports. A post-graduation student in political science, Shreya is also a professional 10m air pistol shooter. Taking after her athlete father, she was naturally inclined towards the athletic life.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT