“Why Not?”- At 35 Years, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Still Confident of Breaking FloJo’s World Record

Published 12/19/2021, 7:23 AM EST
Athletics – Diamond League – Lausanne – Lausanne, Switzerland – August 26, 2021 Jamaica’s Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce celebrates winning the women’s 100m final REUTERS/Denis Balibouse


Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is the definition of consistency. The Jamaican silenced all critics in 2021 as she clocked 10.64 seconds in a 100m sprint months before the Tokyo Olympics. Heading into the competition, she was heavily favored for gold along with colleague Elaine Thompson-Herah. 

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While the latter beat her to the punch in Tokyo, Fraser-Pryce stayed focused on her performance and is looking forward to the track season next year, in which she will participate as a 35-year-old. Undoubtedly, the record that still stays on her agenda is that of legendary American sprinter Florence Griffith Joyner, or FloJo (as fans call her).

LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND – AUGUST 26: Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce competes in Women’s 100m at Stade Olympique Pontaise on August 26, 2021 in Lausanne, Switzerland. (Photo by Marco Mantovani/Getty Images)

Throughout her career, Fraser-Pryce has worked towards that ‘unbeatable’ world record that lies fixed at 10.49 seconds. FloJo set this record at the trials for the 1988 Seoul Olympics. Over 30 years later, close to none have challenged it. 

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Elaine Thompson-Herah did manage to topple FloJo’s Olympic record of 10.62 seconds set in Seoul itself, bettering it with a timing of 10.61 in Tokyo earlier this year. Shelly-Ann is yet to break FloJo’s records but does not rule out the possibility of doing it in 2022.

“Of course, why not? (laughs) To me, I think that what I’ve been able to accomplish this season has raised some eyebrows,” she said, speaking on SportsMax Zone. “I’ve set my heart, my soul, my spirit, my mind, everything to know that once I put my heart and mind to something and work towards it, then I can accomplish it in life, generally. You’re gonna have obstacles, you’re gonna have things that you have to work through to get through that silver lining.”

Tokyo 2020 Olympics – Athletics – Women’s 200m – Semifinal – Olympic Stadium, Tokyo, Japan – August 2, 2021. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica in action during Semifinal 1 REUTERS/Hannah Mckay

“After running 10.60, I’m feeling the way I did after running anytime. Going back to training and how I feel now, I’m definitely willing to put in that work and reach for the 5 (10.50),” she added.

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Shelly-Ann Fraser Pryce will have competition from Elaine Thompson-Herah again in 2022

Shortly after her gold medal win in Tokyo, Elaine Thompson-Herah came closest to FloJo with a timing of 10.54 seconds at the Wanda Diamond League 100m race. Fans believed she would go the distance at the Prefontaine Classic, but she fell short again despite winning the race.

Tokyo 2020 Olympics – Athletics – Women’s 100m – Medal Ceremony – Olympic Stadium, Tokyo, Japan – August 1, 2021. Gold medallist, Elaine Thompson-Herah of Jamaica wearing a protective face mask on the podium poses with silver medallist, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica wearing a protective face mask and bronze medallist Shericka Jackson of Jamaica wearing a protective face mask REUTERS/Hannah Mckay

Both Jamaicans aim at breaking the record and crossing 10.50 seconds down the lane. They would be in rarified air, being the only women after FloJo to do so. 

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Luke Dias

1551 articles

Luke Dias is a senior WWE and AEW author at EssentiallySports, having published more than 1000 articles on professional wrestling. Having completed courses in Advanced Writing from the University of California and Media and Ethics from the University of Amsterdam, Luke is currently pursuing an undergraduate degree in Journalism from Xavier’s College. His tremendous knowledge of WWE history enables him to make past connections, adding depth to the articles.

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