“They Were All Doing Crazy SH*T”- Joe Rogan Once Defended Lance Armstrong’s Controversial Career With His Two Cents

Published 05/04/2022, 2:20 AM EDT
SACRAMENTO, CA – MAY 15: Lance Armstrong of the USA and riding for Team Radio Shack looks on as he pepares for a training ride in preparation for the 2010 Tour of California on May 15, 2010 in Sacramento, California. (Photo by Doug Pensinger/Getty Images)

Lance Armstrong, in the prime of his career, was a household name. He became a hero, as his story inspired millions across the globe. The story of his victorious battle against cancer and returning to compete in the Tour de France is known to many. The American dominated the grueling event to win it a record SEVEN times.

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But post-retirement, Lance admitted to using performance-enhancing drugs. And alas, the International Cycling Union stripped him of all his titles.

In his podcast, the ‘Joe Rogan Experience’, commentator and presenter Joe Rogan made his feelings known about the whole Lance Armstrong doping fiasco, as he took the cyclist’s side.

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Joe Rogan defended Lance Armstrong

Ever since Lance’s retirement, his doping has been the center of many arguments and discussions. While many argue that the decision to strip him of his title was correct, others feel it was unnecessary based on biological grounds.

Weighing in on the topic, Rogan made his feelings known. Talking about the same in his podcast, Rogan said that Lance’s competitors were just as “dirty” as him.

DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – OCTOBER 06: Lance Armstrong rides along cyclists during “Ride With Lance” at Al Qudra Cycling Track on October 06, 2020 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

“Every single cyclist from 1991 to 2011 was on highly, highly augmented programs, they were all doing crazy sh*t,” he said. “The fact that Lance won in those seven years just tells me he was training harder than anyone else,” Joe added.

He also talked about the biological aspect of the tests. Joe mentioned the fact that Lance only peaked in one race a year. He also mentioned that his hematocrit score never crossed 50% which is considered to be within the normal range. This was a comparison with Bjarne Riis, the ’96 winner of the tour whose hematocrit never came below 60.

Summing up, Rogan mentioned that Armstrong’s lactate tolerance rated highly, which may have helped him perform better.

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Armstrong post-retirement

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Armstrong’s fall from grace ended up costing him millions. From settlements to fines, Lance almost went broke. But a clever investment of $100,000 in Uber helped him stay afloat.

ADELAIDE, AUSTRALIA – JANUARY 14: Lance Armstrong of the USA talk to the media during a press conference at the Hilton Hotel on January 14, 2010 in Adelaide, Australia. Armstrong is in Adelaide to compete in the Tour Down Under which begins next week and will see the debut of his new team Team RadioShack. (Photo by James Knowler/Getty Images)

Even though Lance won’t tell the exact amount of money he made from the investment, he once mentioned that the amount was too good to be true. Listed as an IPO, the company has the potential to have a net worth of around $120billion. While Armstrong may not receive billions, he may still make millions.

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Watch this Story: Rare Clip of Joe Rogan Knocking Out Fighter Cold Unearthed

Right now his worth is somewhere around $50million. A smart investment at the right time helped Armstrong keep his family afloat.

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Naman Gopal Srivastava

144 articles

Naman Gopal is a US Sports Writer at EssentiallySports. Naman is an Undergraduate in Journalism and Mass Communication, with a minor’s degree in Cinematography from the Maharashtra Institute of Technology. An ardent fan of basketball and soccer, Naman was once a national level soccer player himself.

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