Here’s How Much Money You Will Need to Get Yourself a Shining Olympic Gold Medal

Published 01/23/2024, 9:51 PM EST

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The world is abundant with several valuable things and resources. However, many items derive their value based on how unique and rare they are. Collectors of such unique and fancy items have their eyes peeled for something novel but rare in their collection. Interestingly, an Olympic gold medal can help satisfy this thirst they have.

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Olympic gold medals have always been one of the rarest and most prestigious items in auction houses. One of these highly valuable medals is soon going to be auctioned. If you received an invitation to auction, do you think you would have acquired the medal? Here’s how much money you will need to bag a record-breaking gold from the 1968 Olympics.

The ballpark figure of an Olympic gold with a record to its name

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Citius Mag recently added a tweet to their official X account and posted an estimated monetary value of an esteemed Olympic gold medal. The tweet carried the caption, “If you’ve got about $400,000 to $600,000 this could be yours. That’s how much @ChristiesInc in New York City is expecting the auction to fetch for Bob Beamon’s 1968 Olympic long jump gold medal from the Mexico City Games, where he jumped the world record of 8.90m (29 ft, 2 1/4 in).”

The tweet also said, “The world record stood until 1991 when Mike Powell jumped 8.95m (29 ft, 4 1/2 in) at the World Championships. Beamon still holds the Olympic record.” This means that the Olympic record attached to the medal stands strong even after 56 years. 

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Notably, this is the only Olympic medal won by Bob Beamon. He doesn’t even have a world championship to his name. This further increases the rarity of this gold medal. Moreover, the fact that Beamon’s jump couldn’t be measured by the event’s machines makes the jump even rarer.

Stacking the rarity quotient on the prized medal

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The technological boom was experienced by the world in the 1980s after the cold and space wars were going on a full-blown scale. This meant that the 1968 Olympics were yet to see the advanced instantaneous distance-measuring devices that developed later. However, Bob Beamon was ready to break barriers then and there and took a gigantic leap.

The Olympic gold medalist forced the on-ground staff to use a manual measuring tape to measure the length of his record-breaking jump. Notably, Beamon moved away from track and field right after setting a new world and Olympic record and got selected for the NBA. 

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However, he never made his debut and gravitated towards jazz music instead. The fact that an Olympic record couldn’t tether him to the discipline of the long jump and his fleeting nature further adds to the rarity quotient of the medal. Would you be interested in getting this medal for yourself?

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Written by:

Ankit Singh

848Articles

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Edited by:

BHUJAYA RAY CHOWDHURY

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