WATCH: When Andy Murray Became the First British Player To Win Wimbledon Championships in 77 Years

Published 06/18/2021, 8:20 AM EDT
LONDON, ENGLAND – JULY 07: Andy Murray of Great Britain poses with the Gentlemen’s Singles Trophy following his victory in the Gentlemen’s Singles Final match against Novak Djokovic of Serbia on day thirteen of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on July 7, 2013 in London, England. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images)


Hailing from Great Britain, Andy Murray, for many years carried the baggage of the nation’s expectations of breaking the decades-old drought of becoming the first Briton since Fred Perry in 1936 to lift the Wimbledon Championships.

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Chasing the dream, Murray reached three-successive Wimbledon semifinals from 2009 to 2011; however, he lost at the penultimate stage each time.

Finally, in 2012, the former World No. 1 reached his first-ever Wimbledon final to face-off against the Swiss Maestro, Roger Federer. Despite winning the opening set and inching close to a two-set to love lead, Murray faltered and eventually suffered a heart-breaking loss.

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07/07/13 WIMBLEDON 2013 FINAL.Novak DJOKOVIC (SRB) Andy MURRAY (GBR).WIMBLEDON – LONDON.Sheer delight on the face of Andy Murray after clinching a straight sets victory over Novak Djokovic to win Wimbledon. (Photo by Bill Murray/SNS Group via Getty Images)

Andy Murray creates history after clinching the 2013 Wimbledon title

Instead of getting demoralized, Murray showed great resilience in the face of adversity. In 2013, the previous year’s finalist returned to the All England Club and reached his second-straight final.

En route to the final, Murray ousted the likes of Tommy Robredo, Mikhail Youzhny, and Fernando Verdasco, who he defeated in an extraordinary five-set quarterfinal.

Now, the man that stood between Murray and him fulfilling the British public’s growing expectations was Novak Djokovic. In an incredible display of dominance, Murray completely overpowered Djokovic and lifted his first-ever Wimbledon title in straight sets.

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As the crowd thunderously applauded to celebrate his historic victory, Murray broke down into tears as he, after all the tribulations, became the first British man in 77 years to claim the Wimbledon singles trophy.

With the immaculate golden trophy in his hands, the then 26-year-old said “Winning Wimbledon, yeah, I still can’t believe it. I can’t get my head around that. I can’t believe it,” during the post-match press conference.

It was arguably the greatest moment of Murray’s glittering career. In fact, three years later, Murray won his second Wimbledon trophy in 2016 when he downed Milos Raonic in the final.

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Post the 2016 season, Murray suffered from a lingering hip injury that had kept him out of the tour for over two years. With the 2021 Wimbledon Championships around the corner, fans would be excited to witness Murray back in action on the iconic green lawns after a hiatus of four years.

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Kshitij Tayal

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Kshitij Tayal is a tennis author at EssentiallySports. Having played district-level tennis competitions, Kshitij is also a tenured journalist of the sport with over four years of experience. At EssentiallySports, he pens down some thought-provoking pieces on players and tournaments across the ATP and WTA.

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