Wimbledon Cancelled For The First Time Since World War 2

Published 04/01/2020, 11:38 AM EDT


The sad news regarding Wimbledon 2020 has finally arrived. As was being speculated by various sources, the All England Club has finally decided to cancel the prestigious event because of the vicious Coronavirus pandemic. Now, the event will be held in 2021 from 28th June to 11th July.

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

Notably, this will be the first time since World War 2 that the event is facing cancellation. That’s enough to portray the gravity of the situation and the sad circumstances for the tennis community. Wimbledon also released an official statement through their website.

Almost certainly, the entire grass season is set to be slashed. Let’s find out more particulars about the actions of the All England Club.

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

Know More – French Tennis Icon Explains Why There Might Be No Tennis In 2020

Why was Wimbledon cancelled? 

The event has rightly analyzed the situation by predicting the presence of a huge crowd. In addition, it revealed that the health and safety of groups dependent on the tournament are paramount. This includes players, staff and fans.

Ian Hewitt, the chairman of the All England Lawn Tennis Club (AELTC) explained the decision of the board –

“This is a decision that we have not taken lightly, and we have done so with the highest regard for public health and the wellbeing of all those who come together to make Wimbledon happen. It has weighed heavily on our minds that the staging of The Championships has only been interrupted previously by World Wars but, following thorough and extensive consideration of all scenarios, we believe that it is a measure of this global crisis that it is ultimately the right decision to cancel this year’s Championships, and instead concentrate on how we can use the breadth of Wimbledon’s resources to help those in our local communities and beyond. Our thoughts are with all those who have been and continue to be affected by these unprecedented times.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

Statement by the Chief Executive

In addition, Richard Lewis CBE, the chief executive of AELTC had this to say –

“While in some ways this has been a challenging decision, we strongly believe it is not only in the best interests of society at this time, but also provides certainty to our colleagues in international tennis given the impact on the grass-court events in the UK and in Europe and the broader tennis calendar. We have appreciated the support of the LTA, and the ATP, WTA and ITF in coming to this decision, and our friends and partners who stage these grass-court events that are so important in the build-up to Wimbledon. I would like to thank the UK Government and public health authorities for their guidance and support, and we will do whatever we can to assist their efforts in tackling the crisis.

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

“Finally, I would like to thank all those who love Wimbledon for their understanding of these unique and unquestionably challenging circumstances. It is your passion for The Championships that has shaped our event over the years and will continue to do so, and we look forward to preparing a fantastic Championships for 2021.”

Wimbledon has also realized its responsibility as a social entity. It will be looking to aid the government and independent charities in countering the devastating pandemic. The efforts at helping with food supplies have already started.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE :

Aryan Sharma

982 articles

Aryan Sharma is a WWE and Tennis author and editor at EssentiallySports. Being a journalism graduate from Delhi University, he combines his love for creating content with an astute knowledge of almost three eras of professional wrestling. He's also a Roger Federer and Maria Sharapova fan and likes to write on the social impact of these two legends beyond their achievements on the tennis court.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT