Emma Raducanu had Absolutely nothing to Lose Unlike Naomi Osaka, Says Former Wimbledon Champion

Published 09/22/2021, 8:00 AM EDT
Sep 3, 2021; Flushing, NY, USA; Naomi Osaka of Japan gestures after missing a shot against Leylah Annie Fernandez of Canada (not pictured) on day five of the 2021 U.S. Open tennis tournament at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. Mandatory Credit: Geoff Burke-USA TODAY Sports


Emma Raducanu displayed resounding showdown at Flushing Meadows as she clinched her maiden grand slam without dropping a set. While every tennis player is talking about the new tennis sensation, Marion Bartoli has also got something on her plate. The 2013 Wimbledon champion gave her impression on Emma Raducanu and Naomi Osaka’s situations. In her reply, she said Raducanu and Osaka are in totally contrasting circumstances when it comes to handling the pressure.

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“For me I don’t feel absolutely any pressure,” “I’m still only 18 years old. I’m just having a free swing at anything that comes my way. That’s how I faced every match here in the States. Yeah, it got me this trophy, so I don’t think I should change anything,” she joyfully said after claiming the title.

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Marion Bartoli conception on both the champions

Britain’s Emma Raducanu poses with the U.S. Open tennis championship trophy after her match against Leylah Fernandez of Canada in the women’s singles final the 2021 U.S. Open tennis tournament at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York, U.S., September 11, 2021. Picture taken September 11, 2021. Michael Frey/Handout via REUTERS THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.

Marion Bartoli was certainly impressed with the performance Emma Raducanu showed at US Open 2021. When it comes to pressure handling, Bartoli believes Raducanu and Osaka are in a separate category. The pressure on Osaka’s plate is immense compared to the Brit. It’s really not appropriate to judge both the champions.

“First of all, it’s one thing to come out and play when you have absolutely nothing to lose,” Bartoli said to Tennis Majors. “It’s another thing when you win four Grand Slams, earn $55 million in endorsements a year and you have to prove and feel like you deserve that every single time you play a tennis match.”

The Burden on Naomi Osaka is Distinct

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NEW YORK, NEW YORK – SEPTEMBER 03: Naomi Osaka of Japan looks dejected during her match against Leylah Fernandez of Canada in the third round of the women’s singles at the US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 03, 2021 in New York City. (Photo by TPN/Getty Images)

The former Wimbledon champion also highlighted on another important point. She felt Raducanu had nothing to lose, while Osaka had been carrying so much responsibility on her shoulders.  A player like Naomi Osaka wouldn’t be targeting second or third round, she’d obviously fight for the title.

“They were just normal players coming in to try and win a match. And this is why for me it’s going to be fascinating to see, if they keep on winning, they are going to have so many endorsements, so many more brands where it feels like you are owing them something, are they going to play the same way, are they going to behave the same way on the court and still have that same joy? Marion Bartoli quoted on Raducanu and Fernandez.

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At US Open 2021, Naomi Osaka’s run ended in the third round itself by the finalist Leylah Fernandez. This was only the second major grand slam in which Osaka competed in 2021. She withdrew from French open and Wimbledon concerning her mental health issues.

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Atri Bhatt

191 articles

Atri Bhatt is a tennis author at Essentially Sports. He is pursuing his Master's degree in Sports Management from Deakin University, Australia. In addition to critically analysing the game, he also plays tennis professionally.

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