Serena Williams’ Coach Patrick Mouratoglou Details Why Show Courts at Wimbledon Championships are ‘Dangerous’

Published 07/03/2021, 6:00 PM EDT
Tennis – Wimbledon – All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, London, Britain – June 29, 2021 Serena Williams of the U.S. reacts after sustaining an injury before retiring from her first round match against Belarus’ Aliaksandra Sasnovich REUTERS/Peter Nicholls


The All England Club is put under the radar, after accidents on-court create havoc, at the 2021 Wimbledon Championship. A little after Adrian Mannarino’s forceful exit, American legend, Serena Williams, was the next victim on day 2 of the tournament. The 39-year-old slipped mid-game, injuring her right thigh, ruling her out for the rest of the campaign. As the Tennis world demands accountability, authorities say, poor weather conditions are to be blamed. However, Serena’s coach, Patrick Mouratoglou, expresses what he feels is the real problem, following the unfortunate exit of his prodigy.

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Tennis – Wimbledon – All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, London, Britain – June 29, 2021 Serena Williams of the U.S. reacts after sustaining an injury before retiring from her first round match against Belarus’ Aliaksandra Sasnovich REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

“A system to keep the grass dry is needed”- Patrick Mouratoglou

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The roof was out at the center court ahead of the American’s much-awaited clash. However, Patrick believes that the roof itself does more bad than good. “The dangerous courts are courts with a roof. So if it’s wet outside, I’m not sure that this is the point, “ said Patrick.

Watch this story: Drama at Wimbledon Championships involving Nick Kyrgios, Dan Evans, Simona Halep, Jelena Ostapenko and others

After nearly a year of playing games behind closed doors, fans returned to stands and made their presence felt straight away. With 7500 fans in the arena, the atmosphere was unreal. However, that puts the factor of dew into play. “What I can see is thousands of people there breathing. It leads to humidity rising, hitting the roof and falling on the court”.

Tennis – Wimbledon – All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, London, Britain – June 28, 2021 Britain’s Jack Draper reacts after falling during his first round match against Serbia’s Novak Djokovic REUTERS/Paul Childs

Frustrated with yet another disappointing outing, the Tennis genius compares the court, to that in Halle. Demanding for a change, he said, “In Halle, you have air conditioning on the ground that keeps the grass dry in real-time. The Wimbledon roof is clearly needed but a system to keep the grass dry is needed also”.

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Better safety measures are required on-court

From the likes of Federer to Djokovic, many have fallen victim to the grass, at the Wimbledon Championship 2021. Nick Kyrgios,  who was the latest one to slip, was pretty vocal about how he felt. “For those of you who don’t know on grass it’s supposed to slide away, now it just pops up on all of them. Feels like I’m playing at Roland Garros,” he said, mid-game.

Tennis – Wimbledon – All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, London, Britain – June 30, 2021 Australia’s Nick Kyrgios reacts during his first round match against France’s Ugo Humbert REUTERS/Peter Nicholls TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

This year, the tournament faces the wettest weather conditions in almost a decade. Scrutinized by World media, how the organizers deal with that, will now be looked upon carefully. With more game days ahead, players are at a higher risk of injuring themselves. As battles get fierce, the intensity and effort will rise undoubtedly. Fans hope the court won’t restrict these greats from putting on an epic showdown or cause yet another major upset.

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Melroy Fernandes

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