Why Did Naomi Osaka Withdraw From the Wimbledon Championships 2021?

Published 06/17/2021, 11:58 PM EDT
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – JANUARY 24: Naomi Osaka of Japan speaks to media following her Women’s Singles third round defeat to Coco Gauff of the United States of the 2020 Australian Open at Melbourne Park on January 24, 2020 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Kelly Defina/Getty Images)


Four-time Grand Slam champion Naomi Osaka has taken a couple of big decisions this month. After pulling out from the French Open when it was halfway through, the Japanese professional recently announced her withdrawal from Wimbledon.

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In her statement for the Roland-Garros pullout, the 23-year-old had expressed her struggle with mental health. She also said she needed to take some time off before she could get ready to compete again.

Tennis – French Open – Roland Garros, Paris, France – May 30, 2021 Picture taken May 30, 2021 Japan’s Naomi Osaka reacts during her first round match against Romania’s Patricia Maria Tig REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Following that, many believed that Osaka would return for the grass major, the Wimbledon Championships 2021. Moreover, the oldest tennis tournament itself had been confident about her participation. So why did she withdraw from the most-anticipated tennis event of the year?

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Naomi Osaka plans to return at the Tokyo Olympics 2021

Naturally, the recent events must not have been soft on the Japanese ace. However, Osaka also received enormous support from the entire sports community and from beyond.

Above all, what she needed the most was to regroup herself in the company of family and friends. And since she is still not at her best, Osaka did not rush her return and withdrew from Wimbledon.

But apparently, there is a silver lining for tennis fans waiting for the reigning Australian Open champion. The good news is that Osaka is excited to represent Japan in the upcoming Tokyo Olympics 2021.

Inarguably, thatis the world’s biggest sporting event, and hence her participation is a positive step ahead. Moreover, she is looking forward to playing in front of her home crowd.

The decision has indeed raised the excitement level of tennis fans for the Olympics. Even so, her absence in Wimbledon will not be easy to replace.

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What lies ahead for Osaka?

No doubt, the Olympics will play a crucial role for Osaka because a gold medal for her country could restore her optimism.

Following that, the WTA World No. 2 would be aiming to defend her US Open title. Even there, she will have the strong support of the second home crowd in Flushing Meadows, New York.

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Naomi Osaka of Japan celebrates winning match point during her Women’s Singles final match against Victoria Azarenka of Belarus on Day Thirteen of the 2020 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 12, 2020 in the Queens borough of New York City. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

What’s most interesting is that the US Open 2021 is looking forward to allowing a 100% spectator capacity throughout the tournament. So with the crowd behind her, Osaka will hopefully return on the women’s tour.

Do you think Osaka can win another Grand Slam this year?

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Also Read: Following Wimbledon Championships 2021, US Open Announces Great News for Fans Regarding Spectator Capacity

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Purav Joshi

962 articles

Purav Joshi is a Tennis author at EssentiallySports. Having a degree in Films, Television and Media Production, he guided his passion for writing and journalism into the sport of aces and rallies. With over 2 years of experience as a copywriter, Purav has authored over 500 tennis articles.

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