“They Don’t Know How to Adapt”- The Undertaker Highlights a Lost Art in WWE Superstars Today

Published 03/20/2021, 8:30 AM EDT


The Undertaker is a man that has been in the wrestling business for over three decades and a majority of that time was spent in WWE, the most popular company in the sport and the biggest platform for wrestlers all around the world. 

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He has experienced different generations and all the changes that came with time and is the bridge between the old school and the new style of wrestling. 

AUSTIN, TX – SEPTEMBER 07: WWE legend The Undertaker watches from the sideline during the game between the Texas Longhorns and the LSU Tigers at Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium on September 7, 2019 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Tim Warner/Getty Images)

‘The Deadman’, through his vast area of expertise realized that somewhere along the way, the new generation lost the ability to adapt to matches in which they had to go beyond the plan. 

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Speaking on My Mom’s Basement with Robbie Fox, The Undertaker explained this problem and believes that Superstars need to know how to improvise and go off ‘the plan’ they have laid out for the match.

MONTERREY, MEXICO – MAY 09: Wrestling fighters Kane (L), Edge (C) and Undertaker (R) fight during the WWE Smackdown Wrestling at Arena Monterrey on May 9, 2010 in Monterrey, Mexico. (Photo by Alfredo Lopez/Jam Media/LatinContent via Getty Images)

“What you miss when you kind of call it on the fly is being able to feel things, you know, because what happens is when guys will lay out a whole match, in your mind’s eye, ‘Oh, man, this stuff is going to be great’. And then when you go out there, and you actually apply it, you know, so it’s crickets. And then they’re lost because they don’t know how to adapt,” explained Taker.

The Undertaker stressed the importance of adapting

‘The Phenom’ highlighted how the switch to a highly televised product killed this form of the art, but he still thinks wrestlers should know the basics of going off-script. 

NEW YORK, NY – AUGUST 23: Brock Lesnar and The Undertaker battle it out at the WWE SummerSlam 2015 at Barclays Center of Brooklyn on August 23, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by JP Yim/Getty Images)

“It all kind of changed when we started doing live TV, because you’ve got a certain amount of TV time you’ve got put in your commercials. So guys had to hit their cues and they had to hit their marks really tight,” said ‘The Deadman’. 

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“So that’s kind of how everything kind of started to change. And obviously, our product evolved into this huge juggernaut that it is. But I do think it’s important that guys still try and call things on the fly.”

The Undertaker vs Kane during Wrestle Mania XX at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York, United States. (Photo by KMazur/WireImage)

The Undertaker admitted to being able to improvise an entire match as long as he had a start, a finish, and a high point. He emphasizes the art of reading the audience and going with the flow. 

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If he does take up that training role in the PC, we can expect a new breed of Superstars to take over WWE soon. There’s a lot of things people can learn from The Undertaker, and there’s a lot of things people should learn from him and his career. 

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Luke Dias

1208 articles

Luke Dias is a senior WWE and AEW author at EssentiallySports, having published more than 1000 articles on professional wrestling. Having completed courses in Advanced Writing from the University of California and Media and Ethics from the University of Amsterdam, Luke is currently pursuing an undergraduate degree in Journalism from Xavier’s College. His tremendous knowledge of WWE history enables him to make past connections, adding depth to the articles.

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