‘We Want to Save Money’ – Red Bull Gain Key Supporter Ahead of F1 Engine Freeze Vote

Published 02/06/2021, 4:15 AM EST
HOCKENHEIM, GERMANY – Second place qualifier Max Verstappen of Netherlands and Red Bull Racing celebrates in parc ferme during qualifying for the F1 Grand Prix of Germany at Hockenheimring in Hockenheim, Germany. (Photo by Lars Baron/Getty Images)


Formula One CEO Stefano Domenicali thinks all teams should follow the lead of Red Bull in the engine freeze proposal. The proposal seeks to halt engine development of all suppliers at a specified level until the engine regulations are changed. 

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This comes on the back of Honda, their engine supplier pulling out of the sport in 2022. With this proposal, Red Bull can acquire the engine IP of Honda and use it for their purpose in F1 until possibly 2025 when the new engine regulations come into force.
In this case, engines won’t be tinkered with from 2022 onwards. The 2022 engine will be the same as the 2021 variant, with adjustments for e10 petrol to be used.

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Red Bull has been lobbying for the required votes needed to get it over the line. They need six votes out of ten available for the freeze to happen. Red Bull is confident it will get the votes of Ferrari and its two customer teams and Alpine.

F1 boss Domenicali thinks Red Bull engine freeze would be good for the sport

The Italian thinks that the other teams should agree to this proposal. In an interview, he said, “For sure the anticipation [for an early introduction] of the freeze of the engine is a very important point. But I don’t want to say only for Red Bull. It is for the entire Formula One because, as you know today, the actual regulation and freezing are based on 2023.” 
He wants the freeze to happen as it could save teams money. He said, “We want to anticipate the freeze because we want to save money to make sure that the manufacturers and teams can invest in the new engine. And on the one side, that is a priority for a lot of the manufacturers.”
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MONZA, ITALY – SEPTEMBER 01: Former Ferrari Team Principal Stefano Domenicali talks in the Ferrari garage during final practice for the Formula One Grand Prix of Italy at Autodromo di Monza on September 1, 2018 in Monza, Italy. (Photo by Lars Baron/Getty Images)
“The discussions that are in place are going in the right direction. I don’t want to anticipate anything, but I’m confident that everyone will understand the importance of these things happening.”
He implores the teams to agree to it saying, “It is something that is at the center of the discussion in that meeting. And I’m hoping that everyone realizes that is the best choice, for not only for Red Bull but for the entire world of Formula One.”

Why the engine freeze proposal would be good for F1

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The teams in F1 should agree to this proposal as the future of sport could be brighter. This would lead to more manufacturers entering the sport and more investment.
This investment would go to the teams, which they could use for developing their cars and in attaining sponsors. Also, Red Bull leaving F1 if this is rejected would be a bad look on F1. It would ward away anyone looking to join the sport.
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ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES – DECEMBER 15: Jack Aitken of Great Britain driving the Williams Racing FW43 Mercedes during the F1 Young Drivers Test at Yas Marina Circuit on December 15, 2020 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Rudy Carezzevoli – Formula 1/Formula 1 via Getty Images)
There would be no more Haas, Williams, McLaren, Jordan, or Benettons entering the sport. These are the teams which make F1 and would be such a shame if teams like them can’t join.

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Ashish Thomas

211 articles

Ashish Thomas is an F1 author at EssentiallySports. Having followed motorsports since age 5, Ashish holds an enviable knowledge of F1 history. Ashish holds extensive experience in sports writing, having previously worked for SportsQuest and Fansided.

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