Australia Announces Men’s Freestyle, Backstroke, Butterfly,Breaststroke, and Relay Swimming Teams for Tokyo Olympics 2021

Published 07/12/2021, 10:48 AM EDT


Swimming events are one of the most-watched events in the Olympics. As the Tokyo Olympics 2021 is about to start, countries have announced their rosters for the Olympics.

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

The predictions are in favor of the US national to top the medals charts for swimming. However, the Australian Men’s Swimming team has some talented swimmers amongst their ranks, who can light it up in Tokyo.

They have been one of the best swimming nations in the world and will look to leave their mark in Tokyo. Kyle Chalmers and Elijah Winnington lead the pack for team Australia, this time around.

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

Men’s Australian Swimming team for Tokyo Olympics 2021

Notably, the final list was put forth by the Australian Olympic Committee, and there are some new inclusions to the team.

Australian Men’s Swimming team:

Kyle Chalmers–100m freestyle, 200m freestyle

Elijah Winnington–200m freestyle, 400m freestyle

Jack McLoughlin–400m freestyle, 800m freestyle, 1500m freestyle

Mitch Larkin–100m backstroke, 200m individual medley

Tristan Hollard–200m backstroke

Zac Stubblety-Cook–200m breaststroke

Matt Temple–100m freestyle, 100m butterfly, 200m butterfly

Brendon Smith–400m individual medley

David Morgan–200 butterfly

Se-Bom Lee–400m individual medley

Cam McEvoy–relay

Zac Incerti–relay

Tommy Neill–relay

Alexander Graham–relay

Mack Horton–relay

Matt Wilson–relay

Isaac Cooper–relay

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL – AUGUST 10: Kyle Chalmers of Australia celebrates winning gold in the Men’s 100m Freestyle Final on Day 5 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium on August 10, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (Photo by Clive Rose/Getty Images)

Significantly, there are many outstanding athletes in this line-up as the team looks to win medals for their country in Tokyo.

While Ian Thorpe remains the benchmark for Australian swimmers, many talented swimmers can make their mark in Tokyo this year.

DIVE DEEPER

How Quanesha Burks Went From Working at McDonald’s to Making the USA Long Jump Team for Tokyo Olympics 2021

21 days ago

Kyle Chalmers expected to shine in Tokyo

Even though Caeleb Dressel is everyone’s favorite to win most of the events, the 100-meter freestyle event looks to be of certain promise. The Rio 2016 Olympic champion, Kyle Chalmers looks to retain his gold medal; furthermore, cementing his legacy amongst the greats.

Above all, he needs to put in his best effort because Dressel clocked a time of 46.96. Despite coming short of Cesar Cielo’s long-standing record in Gwangju, Dressel’s name is on everyone’s lips as the favorite for this race. Time will tell whether Chalmers could upset the odds, and claim a victory against his rival.

Along with Chalmers, Elijah Winnington is the new kid on the block to come from down under. Elijah notably won gold in the 400-meter freestyle at the 2019 Australian Swimming Championships.

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

Sun Yang’s absence has left the event wide open while Mack Horton got defeated by Elijah in the trails. The 21-year-old swimmer from Queensland is the latest swimmer to join the roster by putting in some incredible performances.

Apart from these two athletes, Zac Stubblety-Cook is an outsider to win the 200-meter breaststroke event. He set a good time for the trails as he hopes to win a medal for his country.

The era of Michael Phelps is over as the introduction of new swimmers adds to the glitz and glamor of the swimming events. But do you think these Australian swimmers are capable enough to challenge the mighty US?

ADVERTISEMENT

Article continues below this ad

WATCH THIS STORY- Top 10 Moments of Olympic Sporting Spirit

Trending Stories

SHARE THIS ARTICLE :

Jacob Gijy

221 articles

Jacob Gijy is an NBA writer at EssentiallySports. Gijy finished his Masters in Counselling Psychology and worked in a hospital for 2 years before his passion for sports compelled him to find his way to sports journalism. A fan of the great Tim Duncan, he is always ready to pick up a debate with anyone who does not offer the centre the respect he deserves.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT