“I Know What I’m Able to Do”- Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce Reveals How She Did Not Let Age Stop Her at Tokyo Olympics 2020

Published 08/14/2021, 5:30 AM EDT
Tokyo 2020 Olympics – Athletics – Women’s 4 x 100m Relay – Final – Olympic Stadium, Tokyo, Japan – August 6, 2021. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica before competing REUTERS/Aleksandra Szmigiel


The 100-meter race is a highly anticipated event in every single Olympic Games. The first name that comes to our minds is obviously, Usain Bolt. However, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce continues to dominate in the women’s category event since Beijing Olympics 2008. The sprinter won the silver medal at Tokyo Olympics 2020. Even though she is 34 years old, the sprinter continues to perform at the highest level possible. She just proved that age is just a number in Japan.

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Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce is a legend

As the Olympics got delayed because of the ongoing pandemic, Pryce had more time to train, probably for her last Olympic Games. The determination she possesses to compete at the highest level in each Olympic Games is remarkable. On speaking about the doubts she faced, Fraser-Pryce revealed what troubled her the most during the preparations.

“I’m 34 now, which is really something because in the track world when a woman turns 30, the assumption is that she’s somehow diminished in her capabilities. So, when I turned 30, there were just so many things in my head to discourage me.”

Tokyo 2020 Olympics – Athletics – Women’s 100m – Medal Ceremony – Olympic Stadium, Tokyo, Japan – August 1, 2021. Gold medallist, Elaine Thompson-Herah of Jamaica wearing a protective face mask on the podium poses with silver medallist, Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica wearing a protective face mask and bronze medallist Shericka Jackson of Jamaica wearing a protective face mask REUTERS/Hannah Mckay

“It wasn’t even like I was trying to prove anyone wrong. I was just trying to prove myself right, that I could do this. I know God has given me this ability, and I know what I’m able to do, and I believe that I can do great things.”

Most of the athletes retire after the age of 30 because of not being pacy enough or injuries. But Fraser-Pryce is still determined to be the best. Being a mother, she is a role model for all athletes, and she paints a picture of being an influential personality in the sporting community.

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End of an era

The sprinter made her debut in the 2008 Beijing Olympics and won the gold medal at that event. Likewise, London 2012 proved to be of the same result as she won the gold medal there as well. Winning two gold medals in back-to-back Olympics cemented her legacy amongst the greats. After that, she won the bronze medal in Rio while claiming the silver medal at Tokyo 2020.

But being 34 is tough. However, Fraser-Pryce had personal goals. Goals that had to be achieved.

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“But I wanted to break the 11-second barrier, and I did that. I wanted to run below 22 seconds in the 200 meters, and I did that. I’m just so grateful to have been able to accomplish those dreams in my life,” said Fraser-Pryce.

Tokyo 2020 Olympics – Athletics – Women’s 200m – Semifinal – Olympic Stadium, Tokyo, Japan – August 2, 2021. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce of Jamaica in action during Semifinal 1 REUTERS/Hannah Mckay

What a story.

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The sheer determination and passion are there to see from this talented sprinter. Fraser-Pryce is an incredible athlete and will be remembered for her exploits in athletics throughout her career. The sprinter would compete in the Athletics World Championships in 2021 and that may be the last race of her illustrious career.

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Jacob Gijy

389 articles

Jacob Gijy is an NBA writer at EssentiallySports. Gijy finished his Masters in Counselling Psychology and worked in a hospital for 2 years before his passion for sports compelled him to find his way to sports journalism. A fan of the great Tim Duncan, he is always ready to pick up a debate with anyone who does not offer the centre the respect he deserves.

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